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Fathers' Day

Forgive me for writing something difficult on Father’s Day but there are times when one must speak up even at times when people are supposed to be celebrating.

I’m sure you heard all about the horror of children of immigrants being forcibly separated from their parents and herded into detention facilities, including officials seizing a baby from her own mother while she was being breastfed. These headlines say it all about what’s currently happening:

US child migrants: 2,000 separated from families in six weeks.

Trump suggests separation of families at border is a negotiating tool.

Abuse of immigrant children alleged in documents examined by Chicago law students.

A former Walmart is now housing migrant children. Here’s what it’s like inside.

Taking children from their parents is a form of state terror.

I have a Facebook friend who admitted that she took on Donald Trump whenever he made his latest outrageous tweet on Twitter and she ended up being blocked by him as a result. (A judge has since ruled that as being unconstitutional but that’s another story altogether.) As for me, I haven’t bothered with attacking Donald Trump mainly because I view his tweets as typical of his penchant for screaming “LOOK AT ME! I AM AN ATTENTION WHORE!” and I just didn’t want to feed his ego by paying attention to them. Until recently.

Yesterday I made a series of tweets aimed directly at President Donald Trump for the very first time. I did this in response to that awful tweet he made where he blamed the Democrats for separating children from their families (never mind the fact that Republicans currently control both houses of Congress as well as the White House and none of the current elected Republicans in Congress have raised any kind of objections to this type of systematic child abuse by the Trump Administration).

Here is my multi-part rebuttal tweet aimed squarely at Donald Trump’s Twitter account.

So far I haven’t received much blowback from those Trump/Make American Great Again supporters and I think it’s because so many people have tweeted their outrage directly at his tweet. It is horrible because he is engaged in what I would call state-sanctioned child abuse. In addition, he is blaming others for this policy that HE AND HIS ADMINISTRATION HAVE CREATED AND IMPLEMENTED. Only a true Trump believer or a total idiot (and there are times when I think that they are one and the same) would actually believe Trump’s tweet.

While I was silent on Trump’s previous ugly tweets (which are too many to reproduce here since it would literally take me several weeks to get all the ones he made since he took office last year), I just couldn’t sit back and let him get away with this. I don’t care if I’m giving him what he wants (more attention), someone needs to take a moral stand and not only say that this is wrong but separating children from their parents is a crime against humanity. We need to stand up and denounce this or else Trump and his gang will gradually start targeting others whom they arbitrarily deem as not being American enough.

It doesn’t help that the Republicans who currently control Congress are sitting by and doing nothing. This is so different from what happened during the Watergate scandal when an earlier generation of Republican lawmakers decided to put country ahead of party and pressured Richard Nixon to resign his presidency.

This non-action by these Republicans is the main reason why Americans of good conscience should go to the polls this November and vote them out of office. If they can’t do the minimum amount of work necessary to uphold the Constitution and stand up to Donald Trump’s excesses, then they deserve to lose their jobs.

The reason why Adolf Hitler and his gang of thugs were able to implement the Final Solution was because many Germans just remained silent and went about their lives.

While you are celebrating Father’s Day today, think about the fathers who can’t see their own children because government officials decided to take them away. (Of course you should think about the mothers as well but I’m only emphasizing fathers since it is Father’s Day.)

All I know is that this incident is yet another reason why I’m glad I sold that talking Donald Trump action figure on eBay soon after he was elected. I don’t think I would even be able to look at that doll—let alone touch it—if I still owned it now.

When I grew up and used to hear about the slavery or the Holocaust in school, other kids would say that they would never had sit idly by while injustice is happening if they had been around at the time. Well guess what? This is one of those times where you have the opportunity to put your money where your mouth is and NOT sit idly by while injustice is happening. You have a choice—either ignore what’s going on now or speak out against this both online and in real life. If you choose the former, you’ll end up having a future generation of kids in a school history class say, “Gee I would have never kept silent while the government took children away from their parents for no real reason unlike all of those other Americans who just looked the other way.”

If you’re a Donald Trump supporter who doesn’t like to read my posts criticizing him, please do me a favor and stop reading this blog. I refuse to stand silently by while watching he and his family destroy this country for their own power-hungry greedy selfish financial gain and nothing you say will ever change my mind. At this point the only way I’ll ever change my mind and become a Trump supporter would be if some doctor performed a total lobotomy on me to the point where I’m unable to remember ever opposing Trump followed by being brainwashed with the Trump propaganda that’s frequently shown on Fox News.

I’ll end this rant with this famous quote by Pastor Martin Niemöller, which inspired me to take on Donald Trump’s Twitter account yesterday. Pastor Niemöller was initially a supporter of Adolf Hitler until after Hitler took power and he became so disillusioned by him that he became one of Hitler’s most prominent critics. He ended up in a concentration camp as a result and he became a Holocaust survivor. For many years he would say this at various public events:

“First they came for the Jews and I did not speak out because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for the Communists and I did not speak out because I was not a Communist.

Then they came for the trade unionists and I did not speak out because I was not a trade unionist.

Then they came for me and there was no one left to speak out for me.”

In a society with plenty of Donald Trump/Make America Great Again supporters, do the opposite of Martin Niemöller and speak up for those who are being abused by the Trump Administration before it’s too late and they start coming for you.

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Ramadan

This week there have been two major well-loved celebrities who committed suicide within a few days of each other. Earlier this week handbag designer Kate Spade was found dead while this morning culinary celebrity Anthony Bourdain had also taken his own life. Both had very successful careers that made them wealthy and both had left behind children who will grow up without one of their parents due to suicide.

I was very familiar with Kate Spade (I used to see her products on sale in some of the more upscale malls) but I never owned any of her handbags. I saw a portion of one of Anthony Bourdain’s shows once or twice but I wasn’t a regular viewer mainly because he used to eat strange foods (such as raw seal eye) and I was a bit on the squeamish side.

These two suicides led to a sudden outpouring on social media where people began to post openly about suicide in an effort to raise awareness. This morning I wrote a multi-part tweet on Twitter about the topic but I wanted to expand on it in this blog post because it gets pretty frustrating dealing with Twitter’s limitations.

Hearing about the suicides of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade have evoked memories for me and it’s not only about the previous suicides of famous people like Chris Cornell.

When I was around six or seven years old I was at a family get-together on my father’s side of the family where I saw my Great-Uncle Jack. About two or three months after that event my family learned that Great-Uncle Jack had jumped from the window of his apartment located in a tall building in Baltimore. Years later my mother mentioned that she had heard that he had grown despondent about the death of his wife just a few years earlier. (Apparently they had been married a long time when she passed away.) She had heard that he had set up a little shrine in his apartment devoted to his late wife and some relatives thought that he was getting too obsessed about her death.

What my mother said about Great-Uncle Jack was the only time that anyone in the family had ever discussed his death aside from the suicide itself. Most of my father’s relatives kept Great-Uncle Jack’s suicide hush-hush as if they felt deeply ashamed that he had opted to end his own life. I didn’t dare speak up about Great-Uncle Jack to any of my father’s side of the family because I knew that someone would have yelled at me to shut up about Great-Uncle Jack. I ended up not knowing Great-Uncle Jack because I was so young when he killed himself. I don’t know what his personality was like or what his likes or dislikes were. Hell, I don’t even know when he was born or how old he was when he killed himself. To me he is a total stranger whose one memory of him at a family event is hazy at best.

As for me, I didn’t even mention Great-Uncle Jack’s suicide as an adult until just a few months ago when I made a reaction video to one of Logan Paul’s videos (which I’ll get to in a bit). Even then I only mentioned his death briefly. For this post I decided to be a bit more open about Great-Uncle Jack’s suicide mainly because I really believe that it’s imperative that we raise suicide awareness and how the suicide of a friend or relative can affect his/her survivors. I initially thought about the ramifications about opening up about Great-Uncle Jack’s death until I realized that his suicide had happened decades ago. Most of the people who were the most directly affected by Great-Uncle Jack’s suicide are either now deceased (such as my father) or they are over the age of 85 and they are probably less affected by that suicide then they once were.

My father’s side of the family was touched by suicide yet again a few years later. I was 12 when another relative on my father’s side of the family attempted suicide not once, but twice just a few months apart. Luckily this relative survived both attempts and he got the professional help he needed. He eventually pulled himself together and has decided against attempting suicide ever again. I can’t really write too much about him because he is still alive and well and he has long since put his past behind him. I’m proud that he has decided that suicide wasn’t the solution for him and he is now focused on living his life.

Two years ago a man whom I only knew as the moderator of a Yahoo! group that focused on our neighborhood committed suicide.

The saddest suicide story that affected me happened just last year. As I wrote in this blog post, my late aunt babysat a boy named Ben from the time he was a baby until he was in middle school. His father committed suicide soon after my aunt started babysitting him so he grew up without ever knowing his father. I used to see Ben from time to time when I visited my aunt, uncle, and cousins. On the surface he seemed to be an average boy with an impish grin who seemed okay despite being forced to grow up knowing that his father committed suicide. I last saw Ben at my aunt’s funeral when he was in high school. I lost contact with Ben until I learned that he committed suicide himself, thus following in his father’s tragic footsteps. He was only 43 years old.

I felt this incredible sadness when I learned about Ben’s death but there was one other emotion I felt that I didn’t write about last year because I just couldn’t handle writing about it at the time. I was angry at Ben for what he did. I saw the Facebook photos of my cousins, Ben’s mother, and Ben’s brothers after they returned from Ben’s funeral. I thought about Ben’s mother who, just years earlier, had to bury her husband because he committed suicide. As a senior citizen, Ben’s mother had to deal with losing her son to suicide and help bury him as well. I can’t even begin to imagine how she must have felt. I also thought about Ben’s two older brothers who had to deal with losing both a father AND a brother to suicide.

On top of that, Ben left a daughter behind. Judging from the few photos posted of her on Facebook, it looks like the girl was somewhere between 5-9 years old when Ben killed himself. Ben had to grow up knowing that he didn’t have a father because his father killed himself. It seems so inconceivable to me that he would perpetrate the same thing on his own daughter so she is now condemned to grow up fatherless while knowing that her own father killed himself. I just don’t get why he would do the same thing to that poor girl that his father did to him—take himself permanently out of the picture through suicide.

So, yes, I was angry at Ben for inflicting the same agony on his family that his father inflicted on him and his family years earlier. I’m not proud that I was angry but that was an emotion that I felt along with the general sadness that he killed himself. But then I began to think more and I realized that Ben must have been in some kind of severe emotional pain in order for him to conclude that killing himself was the only option. I don’t know if Ben tried to seek professional help for his problems or if he had a relative or friend who tried to help him. I don’t know if Ben tried to reach out for help or not. I don’t know if someone tried to reach out to Ben. I hadn’t seen Ben or his family in a very long time so there are parts of his story that I simply don’t know.

Those suicides in my life are the main reasons why I was so infuriated by Logan Paul’s tasteless Suicide Forest video earlier this year. Logan Paul had disrespected that poor man’s friends and family at a moment when they were dealing with their sudden loss. Plus that video came out shortly before the one-year anniversary of Ben’s suicide. I was so offended by that video and YouTube’s poor handling of the matter that I made my own video about it.

Granted Logan Paul subsequently made a very moving suicide awareness video that was very heartfelt and emotional but, unfortunately, it was little more than a cheap publicity stunt. Soon afterwards he reverted back to being a douchebag while YouTube seems to favor their little golden boy moneymaker by turning a blind eye to his antics.

As for me, I have a confession to make. There were times when I had suicidal thoughts myself. I initially had them in the eighth grade when I was bullied really badly and one of the bullies was especially obsessed with making my life miserable. I ended up not doing anything about those thoughts and that psychopathic bully eventually left my school the following year.

There was a time when I actually attempted a kind of a suicide where you intentionally do something that will get someone else to kill you. One example of this is known as suicide by cop. When I was a sophomore in high school there was an incident where three young girls (two of whom were sisters while the third was a friend of theirs) between the ages 8-10 were found brutally murdered in the woods. I wrote about these murders last year so you can go there is you want the full story. In any case the police immediately began a manhunt for the person who killed those girls.

It would be three days before someone was apprehended. In the meantime the person was on the loose. Even though the murders took place about three miles from my own neighborhood, my parents and grandmother (my mother’s mother who lived with us) began to irrationally think that I would be next. I walked to school in the last five years of my public school career because the school I attended were within walking distance. They began to forbid me from taking a popular well-traveled short cut through some woods in order to reach the high school. Never mind the fact that the woods in question weren’t very thick. (I recall that the backyards of some of the houses in my neighborhood used to abut the edge of the woods along that traveled path.)

I grew up as an only child who was constantly being watched by the three adults I lived with. They constantly were on the lookout for when I would screw up and they would pounce on the next opportunity that I made any kind of mistake no matter how minor. My parents were extremely strict and overprotective of me when I was growing up—they were helicopter parents long before that became a hip trendy yuppie thing. The fact that many of the kids ostracized me because they thought I was “retarded” only exacerbated the situation so I couldn’t go to—let’s say—a friend’s house and chill out if living with my parents got too much for me.

On top of that it was only two years earlier when I faced that psychotic middle school bully from hell and I still had some mental scars from that. (Fortunately she was long gone by the time the murders happened.)

I secretly took that shortcut anyway because I was mentally in a dark place regarding the kids in school calling me “retarded” and having parents who were so strict that I used to secretly envy the kids whose parents used to give them very little attention and supervision. At the time I felt that the person would do me a big favor if he would kill me just like he killed those girls.

In any case I never faced the killer and the police apprehended him. He pleaded guilty and he committed suicide just a few years later.

My life really improved when I went to the University of Maryland at College Park and I encountered people who were willing to be friends with me. It helped that they didn’t attend the same schools I did so they didn’t have any kind of preconceived notions about me.

Those suicidal thoughts came back when my husband suddenly ran away from home in late 2011. Here was my situation. I had hip replacement surgery in 2008 and my husband was very loving and attentive the entire time. He was my champion who cheered me on as I underwent physical therapy. When I fell twice in early 2011 (with both falls being about a week apart), my hip replacement was knocked out of alignment. I had to undergo hip revision surgery to knock the hip replacement back into alignment. Once again my husband took charge of my recovery. He stayed home and took care of me while I was recovering from surgery. He would make errands to buy food and needed prescription medications. He arranged to have friends drive me to physical therapy when he had to go back to work. He was incredibly loving and attentive towards me.

To go from that to suddenly deciding that he wanted a divorce out of the blue was devastating to me. He never once told me that he was the least bit unhappy yet he left behind a note telling me that I was the reason why he had to leave home. Worse, my friends told me that he had left me for a friend with mental health problems so severe that she has an experimental pacemaker in her brain and she qualified for SSI disability.

Overnight he went from being my best friend whom I would trust with my life to being my own worst enemy who has shown nothing but contempt for me. It was almost like he had really secretly hated me all those years but he hid that from me and pretended that he still “loved” me but once he left me he really let it all out about how much he really despised me. It would be like encountering a sudden blizzard that dumped 20 feet of snow on a hot summer day.

To make matters worse, he refused to talk to me in person or on the phone yet he would send emails and texts demanding that I adhere to this separation schedule that existed only in his head because, I later learned, he felt a need to get a divorce and marry this other woman by a certain date. (Why he felt the need to have this schedule, I’ll never know. Many of our longtime friends were just as shocked by my husband marrying this severely mentally ill person just two months after our divorce was final as I was.) If I balked at following this schedule or asked him to move more slowly, he would threaten to sue me. I later learned that what he did to me was cyberbullying.

And that’s not to mention that there is some dispute as to whether it’s even ethical for him to have any kind of a sexual relationship with a very mentally ill woman and if what he did makes him a sexual predator at best (and maybe even a rapist at worse) but I’ve already explored that question at length here and here.

So I had suicidal thoughts but I ended not making any suicide attempts. What happened? Well I had people around me who were concerned about me. People in my Unitarian Universalist church were the ones who initially reached out to me. Then I was referred to a support group to people who are separated or divorced and I started going to those meetings. I had other friends who also reached out to me. Long story short, I didn’t attempt suicide because I had surrounded myself with people who cared about me and were willing to do whatever they could to help me.

The big irony is that I’m writing this blog post on a day that would’ve been my wedding anniversary had my husband not left me and got a divorce.

Earlier this year I had a financial crisis stemming from my husband cutting off of alimony while only being able to land a job with part-time hours. I went even deeper into debt and I began to worry about being homeless and lose everything I had ever owned. I thought about suicide but I ended up not going through with it because I signed up with a local group that provides emergency crisis care and I’m currently going through the eight-week program. I also recently had a friend move in with me so we can split expenses.

I think the biggest motivation I had for not committing suicide was my ex-husband. Given the contempt he has shown for me over the last few years, I now seriously doubt that he had ever loved me to begin with. (As to why he would even marry someone whom he didn’t love to begin with, I can’t explain.) I knew that if I had taken my own life, I would be doing what he probably would have wanted for me (to be dead). I just didn’t want to give him the satisfaction that I killed myself.

I’m not fully out of the woods yet but I’m glad that I didn’t kill myself.

I just want to say that if you feel like committing suicide yourself, please call a suicide hotline or talk with a trusted friend or relative first. I know first-hand how a suicide can have lasting effects on those who knew that person, including feelings of guilt and shame. If you are in the U.S., contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. If you are in the U.K., contact the Samaritans at 116 123 or jo@samaritans.org. If you are in Australia, contact Lifeline at 13 11 14. For other countries, visit the Befrienders Worldwide site to find a helpline that’s nearest you.

Remember you are not alone and you don’t have to be alone. There is help available for you.

Easter

Passover

In my previous Passover/Easter/April Fool’s Day post that I uploaded earlier today I mentioned that I did a video where I messed around with some Talk Back Pets that Five Below sold (they basically repeat everything you say to them) by having them say inappropriate stuff like “Hail, Satan!” I uploaded that video on to my various social media accounts on Friday.

Yesterday I ran into one of my Facebook friends in person where he mentioned that he saw my video. He suggested that I edit the video where I remove my voice and just leave in what the Talk Back Pet said. I thought it was a pretty good idea.

I first saw these Talk Back Pets at the Five Below store in Crofton. (I had stopped there on my way to attending the weekly support group meeting for people who are separated or divorced.) That store had a choice of bunnies, chicks, or lambs. For this latest video I decided to go to the Five Below store that’s closer to my home. By that point the lambs were the only ones that this particular store had in stock. So I shelled out $5 and bought the lamb.

Last night I made this short video where I had the lamb give this Easter greeting. I also kept in mind that today is also April Fool’s Day when I came up with this message.

I know some of you may question my decision to reference President Donald Trump and equating him with the Anti-Christ as foretold in the Book of Revelations. That statement was my reaction to reading about how the right-wing Evangelical Christians are excusing Donald Trump for everything he’s done, including his alleged adulterous affair with porn star Stormy Daniels.

On top of it, today Donald Trump made some tweets on Twitter that are really infuriating. You’d think he would avoid making any kind of controversial political statements on a day where people are celebrating Easter or Passover. The first tweet wishing everyone a Happy Easter wasn’t so bad.

But then he became political and nasty on a day that both Jews and Christians consider to be a sacred holiday.

Was it really necessary for him to mention DACA or the border wall with Mexico today? Couldn’t he have made those tweets either yesterday or tomorrow instead of today? Seriously, what in the hell is wrong with him? These tweets are enough to make me not even regret mentioning Donald Trump in my Easter video. In fact, I’m glad I did it. I’m now hoping that the upcoming mid-term elections will usher in new people into both houses of Congress who could provide a united threat to Donald Trump.

Passover

Frida Kahlo, Amelia Earhart, Katherine Johnson and other historic women are being made into Barbie dolls.

We are isolating ourselves online and it’s making us politically dumb.

How a democracy dies.

One man’s story about the time that his father fought the CIA’s secret war in Laos.

10 things to know about artist Suzanne Valadon.

The religious right isn’t doing much for religion.

A white mother went to Alabama to fight for civil rights. The Klan killed her for it.

Palestinians stand up to Israel. Will the world follow suit?

Botcheck.me is a browser plugin that predicts whether a Twitter user is a bot.

1984 quotes that are horrifyingly relevant today.

Why it’s time to cut ties with the digital oligarchs and rewire the web by ordinary people instead of corporations.

Why this brown woman is breaking up with the Democratic Party.

You can reuse old resistors as jewelry charms.

The Koch brothers are the cities’ new obstacles to building broadband.

Why the lost kingdom of Patagonia is a live issue for Chile’s Mapuche people.

A conservative estimate on how many animals have died for the sake of Damian Hirst’s art.

E.T. stars in an adorable new picture book and he’s never looked cuter.

What both sides are missing about Net Neutrality.

19 YouTube comments you’ll see on every music video.

10+ translation fails that will have you rolling on the floor laughing.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Women are calling to an end to sexual harassment in the animation industry. 

To save Net Neutrality, we must build our own Internet.

When blue chips fall like dominoes.

The deranged Twitter thread that proves that establishment liberals have lost their minds.

Why we need to appreciate the talents and abilities of the quiet introverted ones.

The mainstream media quietly erases the role NATO played in bringing slave markets to Libya.

Here’s the line-up of liars you can thank when the economy crashes.

Four WTF lessons the world teaches us about sexualizing teens.

An Internet entrepreneur makes a video expressing how shocked he is that he was sued for stealing a copyright owner’s work.

The myth that college graduates make the best employees.

Medicare for all is not socialized medicine.

Most of America’s terrorists are white and not Muslim.

Facebook’s security chief says that his company’s security is like a college campus but they face threats like a defense contractor.

All of these women of color are badder than Taylor Swift.

Punks and metalheads are infiltrating the system by winning political office.

Walt Disney World is anything but magical for its employees.

Here’s an online trove of historic sewing patterns and costumes.

An essay on being biracial without identity issues.

The 11 most unintentionally hilarious religious paintings.

“Protest Matters” museum shows what resistance looks like.

8 DIY photography hacks using cardboard.

Artists create a cemetery for the things Donald Trump killed in 2017.

This heat-sensitive edition of Fahrenheit 451 can only be read by flame.

Insult teacups for the lady who speaks her mind.

29 huge social media gaffes by huge companies.

The white privilege of the “lone wolf” shooter.

WikiLeaks exposes how the alcohol industry bribed Congress to keep marijuana illegal.

Seven examples of how Amazon treats their 90,000+ warehouse employees like cattle.

Maria Anna Mozart was a musical prodigy like her brother Wolfgang, so why did she get erased from history?

Trump Anxiety Disorder: Is Trump literally making us sick?

The breaking of the Rainbow Coalition and the rise of the “Negro Imperialist.”

J. Paul Getty, the billionaire who refused to pay kidnappers to save his grandson’s life.

An Israeli woman who fled Europe during the Holocaust knits sweaters for German children, inspired by the memory of the cold she felt as a child during the escape.

Books published between 1923 and 1941 are now available in the Internet Archive.

The Republican Party has completely bowed to Donald Trump.

A discussion about anti-careerism.

Inside the shady world of DNA testing companies.

10 ways to join the resistance and fight against Trump right now.

The West backed the wrong man in Ukraine.

Someone asked Twitter to name a badder bitch than Taylor Swift only to get an unexpected response.

Why economists are warning that the Trump tax plan will be an epic disaster.

Here’s a look at some rude and offensive Christmas cards that are definitely NSFW.

After 18 years, About.com is changing its name and shutting down its website—its CEO reveals how it all went down.

If you don’t think Al Franken should step down, you can’t complain about Roy Moore…or Trump.

How the gig economy chews up and spits out millennials.

How free image websites exploit photographers.

Teenagers in Maryland create a pop-up museum to explain their lives and struggles.

A message to Democrats who still support Hillary Clinton.

Silicon Valley’s homeless: Everyday workers in the shadow of tech influencers.

Gig workers are easy prey for bullies and gangmasters.

Twitter, stop making excuses and delete Trump’s account for good.

Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee responds to the threat to end net neutrality in the United States.

Mother of four found dead in her freezing home after her welfare was cut off.

Paradise Papers leak reveal secrets of the world elite’s hidden wealth.

An oral history of the Bauhaus featuring rare interviews in English with Walter Gropius, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and others.

How the fashion world glamorizes rape, abuse, and murder.

The safe word is “Barbie”: kinky doll-sized BDSM furniture and accessories from Russia.

An animated introduction to the world’s most mysterious book, the 15th-century Voynich Manuscript.

Donald Trump is the worst thing to happen to the Republican Party.

Twitter is loving this gay nativity scene with two Josephs.

Black trans filmmaker says the creator of a Netflix documentary stole her work.

An obscure copyright law is letting the Internet Archive distribute books published between 1923-1941.

The 9 most underpaid jobs in America.

The Amazon Effect: How taxpayers are funding the disruption of the U.S. economy.

109-year-old woman says that the secret to long life is avoiding men.

How a narcissistic brand of nationalism is taking over the United States.

Why would Tesla lay off hundreds of workers when it’s ramping up production?

Stop everything and check out these killer needleworks.

Five books to make you less stupid about the Civil War.

Facebook is facing a class-action lawsuit for trying to avoid paying its workers overtime.

3D carving is more than just a tool. It’s also a community and a book.

How colonialism destroyed cultures and shaped the world.

Donald and Ivanka Trump’s brands are tanking due to his pathetic presidency.

Artists are frequently asked to do work for free. As an experiment, an artist walked through a town asking other type of workers (such as barbers and a florist) if they would be willing to work for free.

Click here to learn more.

Twitter verifies Jason Kessler, the organizer of the White Supremacist rally in Charlottesville that resulted in violence that left one person dead.

A historian explains why the Founding Fathers would be baffled by conservatives’ obsession with flag worship.

90-year-old Czech grandma turns small village into her art gallery by hand-painting flowers on its houses.

Have Turkish archaeologists found the final resting place of Saint Nick?

Has the original Santa Claus been found in Turkey?

Guardians can sell the assets and control the lives of senior citizens without their consent—and reap a profit from it.

America is not a society that values human life.

Voices from the anti-Trump resistance.

Hogwarts actually exists? Here are 10 real-life schools for magic.

How much should you charge a band for CD and album cover art?

Yes, Stephen Paddock fits the mass shooter profile.

MilkLeaks chronicles the very worst of alt-right agitator Baked Alaska.

Giant straw animal sculptures invade Japanese fields after rice harvest.

Don’t tell Grandma but cross-stitch embroidery has an extreme side.

Americans are now paranoid that robots will toss their resumes in the trash.

We can’t ban guns in America, but we managed to ban all this other stuff.

The rise and fall of the word “Monopoly” in American life.

A disturbing dispatch from Seattle’s super secret white nationalist convention.

How Trump’s focus on working class men hurts working class women.

“X” marks the spot where economic inequality took root.

It’s time to talk about what’s radicalizing white male terrorists.

The Smithsonian presents a gallery of 6,000+ rare rock and roll photos on a crowdsourced web site, and now a new book. 11:30 am

What you need to know about the tech support scams that target senior citizens who own computers.

7 DIY projects for your old t-shirts.

A cashless society would destroy our privacy and freedom.

Twenty-one colorful cubes compose Denmark’s newly opened LEGO house.

American Flag

Let’s take a moment to remember the sacrifices our armed troops have made for this country on this Veterans Day holiday.

Now let’s go on to the links for this week.

A U.S. military veteran speaks out on the issue of whether NFL players should be allowed to take a knee or be required to stand during the playing of the national anthem.

NFL players never used to stand for the national anthem before 2009, when the NFL switched it as a marketing strategy to make the athletes look more patriotic.

Here are some ways people disrespect the flag daily based on flag code.

Niger is the perfect example of the US state of perma-war.

How Twitter killed the First Amendment.

Sorry, but Haribo gummies are reportedly made with slave labor.

Interesting and colorful paintings made with controlled pours.

Artist shows how people in other professions react when asked for free stuff.

How to be an artist, according to Bauhaus master Josef Albers.

Artists who caught companies and fake artists shamelessly copyright their work and selling it.

White people commit the most heinous crimes, so why is America terrified of black men?

11th-century herbal remedy guide now digitized and online.

Wall Street got a bailout, why not Puerto Rico?

One man’s hobby is to Photoshop himself into various celebrity photos in a hilarious way.

Facing poverty, adjunct professors in America turn to sex work and sleeping in cars.

How to master color theory.

Trumpism run amok: How Alabama’s GOP runoff explains the brave new world.

Profile of an American city where the government barely exists.

Is this the end of the job as we know it?

Ta-Nehisi Coates explains why America should have seen Trump coming.

Leonardo da Vinci’s bizarre caricatures and monster drawings.

Hurricane Maria started in 1898: how America spent more than a century brutalizing Puerto Rico.

The United Nations says that robots could destabilize the world through war and unemployment.

How many Palm Beach mansions does a Wall Street tycoon need? As many as destroying America’s hometown newspapers can buy him.

Smithsonian digitizes and lets you download 40,000 works of Asian and American art for free.

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