You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘YouTube’ tag.

Here’s the story so far. A YouTube star named Logan Paul flew to Japan with a few of his buddies where he made a series of vlogs that basically dissed both the Japanese and their culture and they went to great effort to be the epitome of the Ugly American stereotype. If that weren’t enough, Logan Paul and his friends went to a park in Japan that’s known as the Suicide Forest because many people frequently travel there to commit suicide. Logan Paul and pals went off of the marked trails and went further into the woods where they found a guy who had recently hanged himself. Logan Paul then filmed the dead body in nauseating detail while he and his pals laugh and cracked tasteless jokes.

Logan Paul uploaded that video online where it experienced a nasty backlash. Many people flagged that Suicide Forest video yet YouTube kept it online and it even listed that video on its Trending list along with a thumbnail of Logan Paul wearing that goofy Toy Story hat and that hanged body. The video was taken offline by Logan Paul himself and not YouTube after it had received so many views and so much backlash.

In the wake of that debacle, YouTube decided to remove Logan Paul from its very lucrative YouTube Red and Preferred Partner programs while keeping him on the regular Partner program. At the same time YouTube decided to notify a bunch of smaller YouTube channels (including my own Sagittarius Dolly channel) that they will be removed from the Partner program on February 20 unless they get a huge amount of both subscribers and watch hours. YouTube said that it was being done in the wake of the Logan Paul Suicide Forest debacle even though thousands of innocent people are being unfairly penalized for what Logan Paul did. I did a video on the subject titled Dear YouTube, Why Should Small Content Creators Like Myself Pay the Price for Logan Paul?

A few weeks after that video, Logan Paul attempted to show remorse for his actions by putting out a video titled Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow, which is a very nicely done PSA that seeks to raise awareness of suicide. Many people on the Internet were crowing that it’s a new chapter in Logan Paul’s life as he has learned his lesson. I didn’t join the crowd initially because I wanted to see what he does next after releasing that video. Basically he did a few things that led me to conclude that Logan Paul’s suicide prevention video was little more than a PR stunt and he hasn’t really gained any new sense of empathy for suicide victims or anyone else. I did a second video where I recorded my reaction to seeing Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow while blasting Logan Paul for his post video antics titled Why Logan Paul can take his “Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow” Video and Shove It.

I thought I was done with making videos blasting Logan Paul. But then something else happened today. Logan Paul made yet another video that has gotten the Internet in a tizzy. As The Guardian puts it:

In a video uploaded on Monday, he tasered two dead rats and removed a live fish from water and “performed CPR” on it. YouTube responded by suspending all advertising on his channel.

Basically YouTube has removed Logan Paul from its regular Partner program so he can no longer collect any kind of ad revenue on any of his videos. But the BBC has a further detail about Logan Paul’s latest punishment:

This time it has decided to temporarily suspend all advertising on his channels.

That’s right, the suspension is just temporary and YouTube could easily reinstate Logan Paul to that program at a later date when this newest round of outrage dies down.

Personally I think it’s not enough. Logan Paul has been given so many chances and has screwed them all. I’ve seen other YouTubers get their videos yanked off-line and even thrown off the platform for lesser violations that what Logan Paul has done. I know that Logan Paul is YouTube’s cash cow but this is a time when that cash cow has too much of a dark side that will affect YouTube’s reputation.

Meanwhile thousands of other channels like myself will soon be demonetized due to Logan Paul and other YouTubers who’ve done wrong (such as DaddyOFive). I made a short video expressing my outrage that Logan Paul is getting as what amounts to a slap on the wrists. It’s the shortest of my Logan Paul rants because I’ve already gone over so much material in my previous two videos. Here is Another Open Letter to YouTube Regarding Logan Paul and Demonetizing Smaller Channels Like My Own.

I promise that this will be the last video I’ll make about Logan Paul and YouTube because I have too many other things to worry about at the moment.

Advertisements

Not too long ago I made a video that’s an open letter to YouTube where my channel (also called Sagittarius Dolly just like this blog) is in danger of being demonetized. YouTube decided to do this in the wake of Logan Paul’s Suicide Forest video except YouTube is penalizing the wrong people.

This past week Logan Paul uploaded the first new video he made since both the Suicide Forest video and his subsequent apology video. It’s a nicely done PSA called “Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow” and it included an interview with a man who attempted suicide by jumping off of the Golden Gate Bridge and he miraculously survived. Here’s the video:

The video seemed promising even though there was one thing that had bothered me. Had Logan Paul simply made that Suicide Forest video then I would say that this new video is sufficient enough to prove that Logan Paul has learned a lesson from this incident. However, prior to the Suicide Forest video, Logan Paul made other videos where he and his pals essentially made fun of the Japanese and their culture while visiting their country. As of this writing he has yet to issue any kind of apology to Japan for his awful behavior. Here are the lowlights of those videos that were compiled by We The Unicorns.

I didn’t immediately jump on the “Logan Paul has learned his lesson” bandwagon because of that lack of apology to Japan. I’m glad I sat out that bandwagon because there were two recent incidents that had me question the sincerity of Logan Paul’s “Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow” video. One was an inappropriate comment he made on a picture that was posted on rapper Cardi B’s Instagram account. The other was this interview he made on ABC’s Good Morning America where he basically said that the guy committed suicide in the Suicide Forest as a way for him to make that Suicide Forest video and raise awareness of suicide prevention. You can watch this interview in its entirety—if you can stomach it.

In response I made this video titled “Why Logan Paul Can Take His ‘Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow’ Video and Shove It.” In that video I briefly mention the earliest suicide that affected me when my Great Uncle Jack killed himself when I was seven or eight years old. Feel free to share it with everyone you know.

Writing off Logan Paul is no big loss for me and I definitely won’t regret making my latest video. Here’s a video I found which goes over previous outrageous things Logan Paul has done in the U.S. prior to his fateful Japanese trip that will have your blood boiling.

Last week I received this email from YouTube announcing that my Sagittarius Dolly channel (which I named after this blog), which I registered in its regular Partner program, is in danger of being demonetized due to its recent new standards it has instituted. Under the new system I am now required to have a minimum of 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours (where I never used to have a quota before under the old system) or else I will lose all monetization.

Granted I never made much money. (YouTube required a $100 minimum before it would even cut a check or put money into my PayPal account. The most I ever made in any month was around three or four dollars so I never received any cash from YouTube.) But it really sucks that YouTube has instituted these new rules in an effort to avoid that Logan Paul Suicide Forest incident but these rules seemed to target less popular channels like myself instead. This article in USA Today says that YouTube’s stricter requirements would still not have prevented Logan Paul from uploading his Suicide Forest video because his channel had already exceeded YouTube’s quotas.

Basically those of us with less-popular channels are paying the price for Logan Paul’s Suicide Forest stunt and it’s not fair. I made this video that’s an open letter to YouTube. I included some background about the Logan Paul Suicide Forest incident (don’t worry, my video does not show any dead bodies because I feel that poor suicide victim’s friends and family have already suffered enough from what Logan Paul did) but it basically focuses on how I feel that it’s not fair that people like me have to pay the price for the antics of Logan Paul and other popular YouTubers (such as DaddyOFive and PewDiePie).

UPDATE (January 27, 2018): I came across this article on The Motley Fool that is totally critical of YouTube’s new standards and it makes the same point that I’ve been making that the wrong people are being penalized for Logan Paul flying to Japan and making that Suicide Forest video. As this article explains:

This still seems like a bad business decision. YouTube is a big business, and the number of creators generating six figures in revenue has soared 40% over the past year. The problem is that few of them became overnight success stories. You start small. You work your way up. Shutting off the partnership program until late in the popularity cycle is going to turn off a lot of potential contributors. This is going to open the door for other social media sites and video-sharing outlets to introduce monetization solutions for mainstream users, and it’s not going to stop the next YouTube celebrity from doing something ill advised to leave marketers revisiting brand safety issues again. Chaos among upstart hungry creators will be a dinner bell somewhere else.

YouTube is throwing out the babies, but it’s keeping the bathwater.

I couldn’t have said it better myself.

UPDATE (February 3, 2018): I made another video in response to Logan Paul’s “Suicide: Be Here Tomorrow” and his latest antics that call into question the sincerity of that video.

Martin Luther King Day

Today is Martin Luther King Day, which honors the man who gave his famous “I Have a Dream Speech” where he said that he hoped that his four children would be judged not by the color of their skins but by the content of their character. While some things have improved in race relations since King’s murder fifty years ago this April, sadly white people in this country have a long way to go before we can all say that racism is pretty much history. It pains me to write this as a white American woman but I feel urged to call things as I see them, especially since there were two ugly international incidents that took place a week apart that literally make me embarrassed to be a white American.

The new year kicked off with a YouTube star named Logan Paul who has apparently amassed a huge following among kids (which is why I had never heard of him before). This video by TheTalko shows a basic primer about Logan Paul and his brother, Jake, for those who have never heard of these two.

Recently Logan Paul and his friends decided to travel to Japan where they made a series of travel vlogs that essentially mocked the Japanese and their culture. This video shows the lowlights of Paul’s first few Japan travel videos while That Japanese Man Yuta provides English-language commentary of his opinions about Paul’s antics in Japan.

As for the piece de resistance, Logan Paul and his friends decided to go to a park that has a reputation for being known as the “Suicide Forest” because of the huge number of people who have taken their lives there over the past several decades. When they stumbled upon the body of a man who recently decided to hang himself, they kept on filming both the body and themselves laughing and making jokes about finding a dead body. Logan Paul uploaded the video only to take it down a day later after people started to react negatively to that video.

The video below isn’t the original video that Logan Paul made. It’s one that shows only the excerpts from the original video that focuses on Logan Paul’s reactions to finding that body in the forest along with commentary by penguinz0. (The few scenes that show the suicide victim’s body have been completely blurred in this video.)

Here are a few things about Logan Paul and his antics in Japan:

1. Of all of the public parks located throughout Japan he could’ve visited, he chose the one that has the reputation as being the “Suicide Forest.”

2. From what I’ve read about this park, it has clearly defined nature trails that visitors are expected to follow while they are touring the park. Logan Paul and his friends intentionally went off of these trails in order to go deeper into the forest. What other reason could they have done this in a park known as the “Suicide Forest” if they weren’t hoping to find a dead body while making a video that’s a poor imitation ripoff of The Blair Witch Project?

3. When they found the body the first thing they could’ve done was to call the Japanese equivalent of 911 or try to flag down a park ranger/park employee/police officer/someone in a position of authority. But they didn’t do any of these things. Instead they continued with making the video where Logan Paul is cracking tasteless jokes about finding the body while shooting footage of that dead man.

4. On top of it, Logan Paul was wearing a goofy hat resembling the head of one of the three-eyed green alien toys from the Toy Story movies while laughing and cracking jokes about finding a dead body, which only further showed how callous he was about finding a dead body in a park known as the “Suicide Forest.” It would be like me going to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia wearing a Mickey Mouse hat with a matching Mickey Mouse jacket and doing a livestream of myself cracking tasteless jokes by the graveside.

5. What Logan Paul and his pals refuse to realize is that the body they found wasn’t something that was put there for their amusement. That man who committed suicide was somebody’s son, somebody’s brother, somebody’s nephew, somebody’s spouse/significant other, somebody’s father, somebody’s uncle, somebody’s cousin, somebody’s friend, somebody’s neighbor, somebody’s coworker, etc. I can only imagine how those who knew that man felt when they learned that some foreigners made a video featuring the man’s dead body while cracking tasteless jokes and laughing at it.

Ironically this month is the one-year anniversary of the suicide of a guy whom my late aunt used to babysit from the time he was a baby until he reached middle school. I met him a few times when I used to visit my aunt along with my uncle and cousins. (I last saw him at my aunt’s funeral years ago.) I’m glad that the person who found Ben’s body called 911 instead of pulling out a smartphone and start making a video about how he/she found a dead body while cracking tasteless jokes then uploading it online.

One of my African American friends wrote a post on Facebook that basically said that the Logan Paul video incident was reminiscent of those photos of lynched African Americans in the Deep South that included white people who were gathered around the body smiling and laughing like they were out for a fun picnic day rather than actually being at the scene of a murder. (Yes, those lynchings were murder.) In this case it happened to be a Japanese man who committed suicide that was the target of the twisted amusement of Logan Paul and his friends but the result was the same. They felt that they were entitled to smile, laugh, and jeer at the body of a nonwhite man because he wasn’t born white so he’s more of an “other” and less of a human than they are.

After all, if they had found the body of a white man who committed suicide, would they have made a similar video? My bet would be “no.”

I came across this video from Reina Scully, a Japanese citizen who grew up in the United States, who explained the Japanese perspective on death and the Suicide Forest and why Logan Paul’s actions towards finding that body was offensive to the Japanese.

The only silver lining is that he has lost some lucrative deals with YouTube and Blackpills and he has also taken a break from his daily vlogging on his YouTube channel. Only time will tell whether his career as an online celebrity will ever recover from this debacle.

Even though Logan Paul was last week, this month in ugly white Americans didn’t stop there. This week President Donald Trump unleashed an international incident where, in a meeting, he pretty much called Haiti and Africa “shithole countries.” (Never mind the fact that Africa is a continent not a country.) He even complained about how there are very few immigrants from Norway.

I’ll admit that Haiti and Africa have their problems, which are due in large part to the legacy of white European colonialism dating back several centuries and which would warrant an entire series of separate blog posts in order to explain in full detail. (The late blogger Steve Gilliard did such a series on colonialism back in 2004 that’s so thorough that it’ll take you at least two days to go through but it’s definitely worth reading. This page has the links to the entire series.) Had the Europeans left these places alone, they would be much better off today with far fewer problems (especially with poverty).

Donald Trump has a history of racism that goes back decades. It was only natural that he would run for president while aligning himself with a political party that was once fairly progressive (it was antislavery in the days of Abraham Lincoln and it was another Republican, Theodore Roosevelt, who broke up a lot of the monopolies that were in operation at the time while championing conservation by establishing the national park system) but it ended when Richard Nixon started his Southern Strategy where the Republicans started to reach out to white racists who pined for the old days of the Confederate States of America.

It resulted in Republicans being obstructionists during Barack Obama’s time in office due largely because Obama was the first African American elected to the White House. It resulted in white Republicans like this infamous photograph of then-Arizona Governor Jan Brewer literally angrily yelling and sticking her finger right at President Obama’s chest when he arrived to that state on a visit. If both of the parents of President Obama had been white, Governor Brewer would’ve probably treated him with more respect instead of openly berating him like he was a naughty child.

In every nation on Earth it is the leaders who set the example for how its citizens behave. I’ve met older people who joined the Peace Corps and/or pursued careers in the civil service after hearing President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration speech that had this famous line: “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” They could have made more money had they worked in the private sector but they felt inspired to pursue a different career path of serving others as a result of Kennedy’s speech.

When you have leaders like Donald Trump who are openly trying to find ways of banning non-whites from entering this country while turning a blind eye to the vicious acts of white supremacists (such as what happened last year in Charlottesville), you’re basically signaling to white Americans that it’s okay to look down on non-whites as being less-than-humans. While it’s not fair to blame Donald Trump for Logan Paul doing what he did in Japan, it’s the white supremacy style of his current leadership that has given people like Logan Paul the idea that it’s okay to travel to a foreign country and make a series of videos mocking nonwhites along with their customs and traditions. Just as Donald Trump thinks that Haiti and Africa are shitholes worthy of contempt, Logan Paul thinks that the Japanese are funny looking people with slanted eyes who make weird video games and weird big-eyed cartoon characters who are worthy of contempt.

With that mindset coming from the White House, it’s no wonder that Logan Paul decided to make that nasty video about finding a dead body in the Suicide Forest.

Uber can’t be fixed—it’s time for regulators to shut it down.

A new book examines how the upper-middle class has enriched itself and harmed economic mobility.

The rise of the 21st century Victorians.

Brooklyn’s famous Green Lady explains her lifelong devotion to the color green.

The far-out sci-fi costume parties of the Bauhaus school in the 1920s.

It’s the end of the shopping mall as we know it.

How to deal with a 4Chan troll. There is some information that’s useful for anyone who’s dealing with any kind of online troll regardless of whether it involves politics or not.

Low-income workers who live in RVs are being chased out of Silicon Valley streets.

Feminist publication makes history by appointing black trans woman as editor-in-chief.

The sketchbook of drawings done in ballpoint pen by Nicolas V. Sanchez.

A look at the female pioneers of the Bauhaus art movement.

The fight for health care is really all about civil rights.

23 ways to treat yourself without buying or eating anything.

Glow-in-the-dark “toonie” coins celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary.

These bosses share the worst interviews they’ve ever seen and the results are stunning.

Browse a collection of over 83,500 vintage sewing patterns.

Bid on old computers, speakers, radios, and other junk from the bowels of RadioShack.

This transgender doll is making huge strides in teaching children about gender roles.

She took on Tesla for discrimination. Now others are speaking up.

A new kind of tech job emphasizes skills, not a college degree.

Women in tech speak frankly on the culture of harassment.

Over decades of poverty, Detroit’s have fostered a resilient informal economy based on trust.

GoFraudMe is a blog that exposes fake GoFundMe campaigns.

Rural America is the new “inner city.”

3 ways to be seen as a leader in your field.

Artist repaints mass-produced dolls to make them look realistic and the result is amazing.

Every Sega game ever made is coming to iOS and Android for free.

Edvard Munch’s famous Scream painting animated to Pink Floyd music.

Despite serving time in a Russian prison under Vladimir Putin, a member of the punk rock group Pussy Riot is still defiant.

This 106-year-old cooking show host is YouTube’s oldest creator.

Ramadan

A look at the Silicon Valley billionaires remaking America’s schools.

Five CEOs who value humanity over profits.

Here are the details about Apertus AXIOM Beta, an open source camera.

Here’s a look at the oldest color photographs that vividly show what the world looked like 100 years ago.

The necessity of the Millennial side-hustle.

Google Drive will soon back up your entire computer.

A recent report shows that knitting can slow the onset of dementia.

A photo essay looks back on a groundbreaking interracial marriage on the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court Loving v. Virginia decision.

Alice Seeley Harris’ photos exposed the horrors of colonialism in Africa.

Open source TurtleBot 3 Robot Kit runs Ubuntu and ROS on Raspberry Pi.

Meet the Aussie man crocheting his way to Instagram stardom.

Iowa IT firm caught posting “No Americans” job listing, which raised the continuing controversial issue of hiring foreign-born H-1B workers.

Millennials are obsessed with side hustles because it’s all they’ve got.

The inventor of the Roomba has just launched a weed-killing robot named Tertill.

How photography shapes our view of Native Americans.

Konami reportedly blacklisting ex-employees across Japanese video game industry.

Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com (which currently houses this blog that you are currently reading), is closing its San Francisco office because most of its employees prefer to telecommute instead of showing up to work in person.

New York Public Library turns subway cars into mobile ebook libraries.

How the recently-deceased Batman actor Adam West played a prank on anyone who tried to look him up in the local phone book.

A free tutorial on how to make wind-up paper butterflies.

Over a decade later the first YouTube stars reflect on their fame and changes that happened to the YouTube platform over the years.

Ramadan

A survey of the open source community finds widespread harassment and gender imbalance.

Teacher launches crochet campaign to fund the victims of the Manchester attack.

Dubai gets its first robot cop.

Verizon will slash more than 2,000 jobs from Yahoo-AOL when the deal closes this month.

Why the mainstream media should pay for the right to use videos and photos that were originally shared on social media.

Prison inmates crochet 150 blankets for veterans.

Security experts warn that the My Friend Cayla doll is susceptible to being hacked.

How YouTube celebrities have lead to the rise of YouTube tabloids that keep tabs on them.

Learn about Karen Wetterhahn, the chemist whose poisoning death changed safety standards.

Your grandma’s crochet is wildly in fashion.

This startup wants to turn YouTube unboxing videos into a big business.

These three industries are making the most out of 3D printing.

New report says Walmart punishes employees for taking sick days.

How banks are using artificial intelligence up front and behind the scenes.

Israeli police unveil first-ever 3D printed police car.

Why Adobe pays creatives to do whatever they want for a whole year.

FCTRY has launched a Kickstarter campaign to produce a Senator Elizabeth Warren doll, the proceeds of which will be used to fund Warren’s 2020 presidential campaign (if she decides to run).

One of the first computer video games is born again in open source.

A robot could cut your hair in the future.

Robot dog has an artificial woof that sounds like the real thing.

How Adobe got its users hooked on subscriptions.

Ramadan

Last fall I started a separate YouTube channel after a friend of mine urged me to do so. It’s supposed to be a “professional channel” that’s designed to build my personal brand. He was saying that doing everything that he told me to do would result in my getting hired. He wanted me to start doing book reviews where I would check nonfiction books (preferably with “uplift”) out of the library, read them, and do video book reviews just like what he does on his channel. I also added some videos I did using the MySimpleShow.com platform plus one video that I shot when the local shopping center started playing Christmas music the day after Halloween. (Yeah, that one was strange.)

I started to lose enthusiasm for that channel after the first few tries. I think the problem is that I had created that channel to someone else’s specifications instead of my own, even though it’s supposed to be my channel in theory. I attempted to put my own personal touch by doing this video review for this book I found in the library—a book on the history of 20th century fashion called Dressing the Decades by Emmanuelle Dirix. I enjoyed working on that book review the most because it was on a topic that interested me. While that video review got more hits than the others I’ve done, I decided to stop doing the video book reviews because it wasn’t worth the effort I had put into those video book reviews only to get very anemic responses.

But then last month I got a message through Facebook from Emmanuelle Dirix herself saying that she liked what I did. I was so thrilled with the response that I wrote a blog post about it.

At the same time this happened I had just started reading the latest library book I had checked out. It’s called Lonely Boy: Tales From a Sex Pistol and it’s Steve Jones’ memoir about his life and career as The Sex Pistols guitarist. I originally had no intention of doing any kind of book review—I just wanted to read it because I’ve been a Sex Pistols fan since I was a teen.

But after hearing from Emmanuelle Dirix about my review of her book, I decided to try doing a video book review of Lonely Boy just to see what kind of response I’ll get from it. I may or may not do more video book reviews depending on the response I get to this one. It takes a lot of effort to make these videos (including using Post-It Notes to mark excerpts that I need to digitally copy, writing a script, and making the video itself).

So, without further ado, here is my video review of Lonely Boy: Tales From a Sex Pistol written by Steve Jones and Ben Thompson.

The forgotten story of the Radium Girls, whose deaths saved thousands of lives.

A grandmother reacts joyously to receiving a doll as a Christmas present because her family was too poor to afford to buy her one when she was a child. Her reaction says a lot about the effects of poverty on children.

29 places to market craft tutorial videos to attract buyers.

Facebook’s next frontier: brain-computer interfaces.

This artist illustrates what it is like to live with anxiety and depression.

How the mother-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II saved Jews during the Holocaust.

13 sewing YouTube channels that will teach you the craft of creating your own clothes.

How the Internet is changing access to anime all over the world.

These vintage photographs document a time when the women of Afghanistan didn’t have to cover themselves with burkas and were allowed to live independent lives in a peaceful country.

A man who has gathered stories from people who work at what he calls “bs jobs” describes how these jobs fall into five different types.

11 arts and crafts apps for the DIY enthusiast with a smartphone.

Fugitive whistle-blower Edward Snowden praises OpenStack and open source software because it enables people to reveal and share information without corporate or government interference.

Is the Gig Economy working?

Google’s Autodraw AI is an open source program that instantly converts your doodles to clip art.

How one man’s career proves that video games are serious art.

Robot painters take part in art contest.

This person claims to have learned more from watching YouTube videos than from taking college classes.

A Beatles fan is hunting down all of the original photos that were used on the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

A free tutorial on how to make a Lego Man Minifig mask.

How a humble pineapple became art.

A model is making 3D cross-stitch embroidery with the most realistic hairstyles.

Rochester residents crochet massive Susan B. Anthony mural.

How social media can help craft your persona and build your personal brand.

A Minnesota laundromat that has thousands of dolls hanging from the ceiling.

Nordstrom now sells $425 mud-caked jeans for those who want to look like they are manual laborers without having to endure the great outdoors.

Excerpts from a 1939 magazine that now costs $950 because it includes an article written by the nephew of Adolf Hitler titled “Why I Hate My Uncle.”

Stitch by stitch, a brief history of knitting and activism.

10 awesome places to find background music for your video projects—many of them are free!

A new book coming out soon features the hundreds of women who helped create such Disney classics as Pinocchio.

Balenciaga has come out with a large blue bag that looks very similar to IKEA’s 99 cent large blue bag—except Balenciaga charges a whopping $2,145 for its version.

Galleries for the super-rich turn to populist revolt art.

Meet Z Yang, American Girl’s new Korean-American doll.

No, Mexico City is not the new Berlin, contrary to what what recently written on Vice.com. Nor is it a utopia for artists and hipsters.

Amazing digitally colorized photographs from World War II of the Soviet Union’s female snipers who went after the Nazis, including a 16-year-old girl and a woman known as “Lady Death.”

How Uber uses psychological tricks to push its drivers’ buttons, including techniques that were originally used in video games.

Will real-time animation apps spawn a set of YouTube cartoonists?

How World War I veterans mended their lives with embroidery therapy.

Very useful tips on how to survive between payment periods as a freelancer.

Five-Minute tutorial reveals how to make your boring photographs look awesome.

A provocative essay on how Google will collapse in the future.

From retail work to YouTube fame: How Digibro made a career out of anime.

10 pioneers taking open source to the next level.

DaddyOFive and the dangerous quest for YouTube fame.

Warren Buffet’s 10 tips that every successful CEO should know about public relations.

Study links flawed online tutorials with vulnerable open source software.

A photographer writes about what happened when Marie Claire magazine used one of his photographs without permission and without compensation.

The best jobs for your personality type.

A really interesting article called “Read This Before You Hire a Social Media Expert,” which was written by a social media consultant where he comes across as being completely open and honest about marketing on social media.

Is the open source software movement a technological religion?

Advertisements

Previous Entries

Categories