You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘virtual reality’ tag.

This U Street bar in Washington, DC shuts down every August so its owner can build schools around the world.

Government costs rise when the local newspaper dies.

Meet the real-life woman behind many of Gustav Klimt’s paintings.

What happens when a bad-tempered, distractible doofus runs an empire?

Take a virtual tour of ancient Rome circa 320 C.E.

In 1912 this Georgia county drove out every black resident.

IKEA asked people to bully a plant for 30 days to see what happens. The results are eye-opening.

The “Real” America: 21.5% unemployment, 10% inflation, and negative economic growth.

How Donald Trump’s grandfather originally made his fortune.

This British gent lives life like it’s the 1940s.

A new study finds that IQ scores are falling and they have been for decades.

This political theorist predicted the rise of Trumpism. His name was Hunter S. Thompson.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

Advertisements

Passover

The day after St. Patrick’s Day I helped a friend of mine with his booth at the annual Maker Faire NoVa that was held at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. I had attended previous STEM Maker events in Greenbelt, Silver Spring, and Washington, DC but it’s the first time I ever checked the Northern Virginia one. I have to admit that this event was the largest event of its kind that I had ever attended. To give you an idea as to how big it was, here’s a video I shot of this event.

And now it’s time for the still photos. I knew I had come to the right place when I saw this statue of George Mason (whom the university is named after) all dressed up for the occasion.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

These signs were further giveaways that I was at the right place.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

The reason why I was there was that I was helping a friend of mine with his table. His name is Phil Shapiro and he frequently hangs out on YouTube and Twitter. He wanted to demonstrate Inkscape, which is the free open source alternative to Adobe Illustrator. He brought a couple of Linux laptops that he made available for people to use. At the last minute he decided to have one of those laptops run Tux Paint, which is a free open source graphics program that is made for kids under 7, which turned out to be a good move because a lot of visitors were kids. The kids seemed to really like Tux Paint so it was all good. In any case, here is what the sign looked like.

Maker Faire NoVa

Here are a few shots of the table that I took before Maker Faire NoVa opened to the general public.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Here’s Phil Shapiro at one of the laptops setting everything up before the show began.

Maker Faire NoVa

And here’s Phil showing off the two laptops with Inkscape and Tux Paint to the general public.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

One of the many kids tried his hand at drawing with Tux Paint.

Maker Faire NoVa

Near our table was one that was manned by Bob Coggeshall, who’s famous in the Unix world for inventing the Unix command sudo.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

There were all kinds of projects that were run off of Raspberry Pi, such as this vintage teletype.

Maker Faire NoVa

There were also all kinds of 3D printed projects that looked amazing.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

There was a refurbished gumball machine that dispensed 3D printed charms for only 50 cents.

Maker Faire NoVa

It was at that gumball machine where I made my one and only purchase from Maker Faire NoVa: A tiny 1-inch printed 3D printed Darth Vader who’s seated like a Buddha. I only paid 50 cents for this cool item.

Maker Faire NoVa, March 18, 2018

There were also some vintage bikes that the public can ride.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

It was at Maker Faire NoVa where I got my first-ever real life glimpse of a Bitcoin mining machine.

Maker Faire NoVa

It was also at Maker Faire NoVa where I got my first glimpse of American Girl’s 2018 Girl of the Year doll. Her name is Luciana Vega, she’s into STEM and her big ambition is to be the first person to explore Mars.

Maker Faire NoVa

This boy was showing his work in progress on his latest project. He was in the process of building his own BB-8 robot from the Star Wars movies.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

There was just a variety of things I saw at Maker Faire NoVa that were simply astounding.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

IMG_5248

Maker Faire NoVa

IMG_5253

IMG_5254

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

George Mason University’s Fairfax campus is pretty big. In fact, I think it may be as big as my own alma mater (University of Maryland at College Park). I briefly went through the campus Barnes & Noble store, which had copies of Michael Wolff’s controversial bestseller about Donald Trump’s first year in the White House called Fire & Fury.

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

Maker Faire NoVa

I really had a blast at Maker Faire NoVa. It helped that the weather was in the 50’s that day so I was able to wear a light jacket instead of my heavy winter coat for a change. I even saw my first robin of the year while I was walking around outside going from building to building while checking out the event. (The entire event was spread over four buildings.) Sadly that warm weather was a short-lived thing because the weather turned really cold and rainy the next day followed by a snowstorm.

The only downside about that event is that for about a couple of days before that event I started to have stuffed sinuses. By the time of that event my throat felt more scratchy as I talked more and more with the general public while I worked at Phil’s booth. My legs had grown stiff and sore by the end of the day due to the huge amount of walking and standing I did throughout the day. The following day I felt extremely tired and sick. I ended up spending most of the next week sleeping (with the exception of the couple of times I went out in the snow where I did some shoveling two days after Maker Faire NoVa). I even ended up skipping the big March for Our Lives on the following Saturday due to being sick. But the video, photos, and fond memories from Maker Faire NoVa made it all worthwhile.

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

I’d originally planned on not having any new entries about any of the winter holidays after January 6 (a.k.a. Little Christmas and the Feast of the Epiphany). But then I decided to check out one more Christmas-related event last Saturday. I couldn’t devote any time to this blog on the following day because I had to go to Baltimore to pick up some artwork I submitted to a recent show that had just closed and I ended up spending some time at the nearby Walters Art Museum then I went home and started to take down my Christmas decorations. So here it is, the last Christmas post until November (at the earliest).

There is a new art gallery that recently opened in Washington, DC called Artechouse, which is located just a couple of blocks away from the L’Enfant Plaza Metro station. It’s not your usual art gallery in that the exhibits are all interactive. When I found out that it was having a special interactive exhibit based on the classic Nutcracker Suite Christmas story, I knew I had to check it out. Except I was doing other things at the same time and I finally realized that this exhibit was going to close after January 7 so I had better get down there if I wanted to experience it.

It was fitting that I went on January 6 since it was Little Christmas. The only downer is that the weather was cold outside. (The entire East Coast was still smarting from that bomb cyclone that hit it just a few days earlier.) When I went downtown that day the temperature reached no higher than 18 degrees Fahrenheit. Yes, it was cold as hell walking from the Metro to Artechouse.

You enter the facility through the lobby then go down a flight of steps until you see a living room and you hear music from The Nutcracker Suite being played.

The living room included the shadow of the Mouse King, who reacts to your movements.

There was this 3D effect on this chandelier that kept on swinging back and forth, which looked way cooler in person than what this photo suggests.

If you stand in front of one of the framed mirrors, a nutcracker emerges who then starts to mirror your movements just like a real-life mirror reflection would.

If you stood in the right place along one of the walls, you could control a spotlight with your hand and shine it over the various paintings. What was cool was that some of the people in these paintings moved until you shined that spotlight over them then the people would freeze and they would look like normal paintings.

One of the side hallways had snowflakes on the floor, which moved in response to your own movements.

This particular hallway led to a formal dining room that was surrounded by lit Christmas trees.

Some of the place settings had signs saying “ACTIVATE ME.” If you had a smartphone or tablet with the special Artechouse app installed on it, you could point it at that sign and see things emerge. Sadly my smartphone camera refuses to work these days so I had to make do with looking over other people’s phones and tablets to see the virtual graphics pop up. I remember one plate suddenly filled with virtual pancakes while another filled with virtual cookies.

One of the side rooms had swirls on the floor that suggested a snowstorm and they responded to your movements.

There was a bar at one end of the room where you can order drinks.

The last photo shows the menu. The drinks were a bit on the pricey side. Some of the drinks had some kind of augmented reality where if you ordered it, you could aim that Artechouse app at it and some kind of virtual reality effect would emerge. Naturally those augmented reality drinks were the most expensive at a cost of $12 per person. There were regular drinks without the augmented reality but, after paying $15 to get in, I wasn’t really into shelling out more money.

I recently went to a Royal Farms Store in Glen Burnie where I had take-out fried chicken with wedge fries. It was really excellent. There’s a reason why Food & Wine Magazine had named it “…best fast-food chicken…” (Okay, I don’t read that magazine but the store had the sign with that quote.)

Royal Farms Store, Glen Burnie, Maryland

I also saw some Bic lighters in that store featuring Run-DMC, Eminem, and Outkast.

Royal Farms Store, Glen Burnie, Maryland

I saw a couple of dinosaur-related stuff at Target. One was a jigsaw puzzle.

Dinosaur Stuff at Target

The other was a virtual reality set that’s a tie-in with the upcoming Jurassic World movie.

Dinosaur Stuff at Target

Click here to learn more.

Silicon Valley is now using empathy as a marketing tool to sell virtual reality equipment.

The late Steve Erwin’s son is an award-winning photographer and these photos show why.

Why it’s hard to separate Woody Allen the director from Woody Allen the person.

Yes, you can make your own solar cells from white powdered donuts.

The first historical record of Jesus describes him as a “magician.”

An interesting looking crochet version of The Exorcist.

Obama goes from the White House to Wall Street in less than one year.

Amateur artist turns old flip-flops into amazing action figures.

12-year-old boy creates creepy yet awesome sculptures using found materials.

The psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.

The making of the first hand-drawn VR cartoon.

People are attacking Kendall and Kylie Jenner for their racist handbags…again.

Ivanka Trump hides behind her White House job to avoid a copyright lawsuit.

LuLa Roe has just changed its return policy and its consultants are screwed.

Scenes from 30 movies re-enacted with LEGO bricks.

Eight before-and-after graffiti transformations that create beauty out of blankness.

World-renowned primatologist Jane Goodall likens Donald Trump to a chimpanzee.

Bruce Springsteen lists 20 of his favorite books.

The chateau you should visit in France instead of Versailles.

Pepe the Frog’s creator has found a reliable way to fight the alt-right’s appropriation of his character.

Street-style photographers unite to proclaim #NoFreePhotos

How the band Rage Against the Machine predicted Donald Trump’s presidency 17 years ago.

This amazing tree that shows how languages are connected will change the way you see our world.

One woman’s quest to save Baltimore television, including some early footage featuring a young Oprah Winfrey.

Download Theft! A History of Music is a new free graphic novel exploring 2,000 years of musical borrowing.

Bic ballpoint pen portraits drawn on vintage maps and stationery by Mark Powell.

April 22 was not only Earth Day but it was also the day that a massive March for Science took place in downtown Washington, DC to protest the Trump Administration’s official denial of climate change while cutting funds for federal research. I thought about going myself because, as someone who was once married to a NASA software engineer, I know the importance of science in everyday life (even if science was never my favorite subject in school).

But then it rained like crazy and I decided to can that idea. I didn’t feel guilt over what I did because I had already previously participated in the Women’s March on Washington and the Werk for Peace dance protest. The People’s Climate March was scheduled to be held in Washington, DC on the following Saturday. In addition, there are more anti-Trump marches on Washington planned for the future which will focus on immigration, LGBTQ rights, and fans of the hip hop group Insane Clown Posse (that one is because, for some weird reason, the federal government has classified the fans of this group as gangs and terrorists).

And I’m sure that the longer Donald Trump stays in office, the more people will hold massive protest marches.

So I ended up going to Silver Spring where I took place in the second annual Creator Con. At least it was held indoors so I didn’t have to deal with being rained on. Here are the photos I took during my time there.

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

There was one thing that blew my mind. There was a band consisting of teenage boys who did covers of classic rock songs like The Animals’ “House of the Rising Sun” and The Rolling Stones’ “Miss You.” I found it interesting that there were kids who did covers of songs that first came out decades before they were even born.

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con

Creator Con was held at Eubie Blake High School, which had these pro-LGBTQ signs on display. I’m old enough to remember a time when a teen openly admitting that he/she was LGBTQ would not only result in all kinds of bullying and harassment but many teachers would’ve been indifferent to that student’s plight. Now there are official signs making a LGBTQ teen feel welcome.

Creator Con

Creator Con

Turn your smartphone into a hologram projector using everyday items.

Tips on how to use emojis correctly and in a professional way as part of your marketing campaign.

Is American retail at a historic tipping point?

Artist crafts classic Stephen King-style book covers for classic songs.

3D printing replicates body parts.

Japan’s largest anime store opens up to international shoppers, but there’s a catch.

Eight things no one tells you before you become a YouTube sensation.

Apple’s most powerful computer in years will be in stores by Christmas.

Facebook releases several new open source tools for video and virtual reality.

How one writer became disappointed by Patreon.

Twitter has a serious problem with bots.

The truth about succeeding in business with your husband.

3D printed cars are the future. But are they safe?

Is multimedia journalism the way forward?

Streamers flock to YouTube Live, but the money (and crowd) is still at Twitch.

Find out if a robot will take your job.

Too many dolls: Is American Girl overextending itself?

PBS travel guru Rick Stevens sacrifices $4 million nest egg to house dozens of homeless women and kids.

Why photography is such a difficult business to get into.

You can now 3D print a tiny pretzel made of glass.

You can now live stream to YouTube from your phone if you have at least 1,000 subscribers.

Microsoft lets users access accounts without passwords.

Robots will soon become our children’s tutors. Here’s why that’s a good thing.

How Android smartphone users can stop Google from tracking your every move with its Google Timeline feature.

Nazi-looted art claim sets new test for Germany.

L.O.L. Surprise is the top selling doll for the past five months with over 2.5 million sold.

Adult animation brings more approachable culture to traditional TV.

How YouTube’s shifting algorithms hurt independent media.

Woman makes spectacular PowerPoint presentation persuading man to date her.

Software audit highlights major security weakness across all open source software.

How to make your kid’s art last forever without cluttering up your home.

The controversial My Friend Cayla doll have been banned in Germany. Parents must either destroy their child’s doll or face a fine of roughly $26,500 and two years in prison.

For animators looking to get into video games, there is a growing community just for them.

Where YouTube went wrong.

Six things you should never store on your work computer.

Why open source pharma is the path to both new and cheaper medicines.

May Day

For the hell of it I recently decided to do an online search to see if an earlier blog I briefly kept before I started this blog is still online and, yes, it’s still up despite the fact that I haven’t added anything new to it since 2009.

The blog is called Adventures in Webkinzland and it’s different in tone from this one. Back in late 2007 the stores in my area were carrying a line of stuffed animals known as Webkinz and they stood out from Beanie Babies and other stuffed animals by this concept: a person would purchase one of the Webkinz animals and take it home. The person would open the Webkinz animal’s hangtag in order to find out a secret code. Then person would log on to Webkinz.com and sign up for an account using that secret code. The person’s Webkinz animal would appear in online form. At that point the Webkinz owner would care for the online pet in the way that one would care for a real-life pet.

I was curious about such a concept (especially about the online part) so I purchased my first Webkinz pet, a unicorn. After playing online for a bit, I thought it would be fun to document my experiences with Webkinz.com by writing an online blog. I would include not only photographs of my real-life Webkinz pet but I would also include screenshots of my virtual pet as well.

Once I registered my Webkinz animal online, I learned that I was responsible for that pet’s health, education, and general well-being and the only way of meeting all of my virtual pet’s needs was to earn Kinz Cash so I could purchase food, tuition, health club, clothes, furniture, and other stuff.

In order to earn Kinz Cash I had to long on to Webkinz.com and do one of the following: Play some arcade games, take part in interactive quiz contests, and get a job through the Webkinz employment agency where you work a drudge job for a couple of minutes. All those methods paid a pittance. There was one other way of obtaining Kinz Cash and you generally get way more money than what you can earn online: Go to a store and buy all sorts of Webkinz-related products (such as trading cards, bracelet charms, bookmarks, and more Webkinz plushies) and enter the enclosed code online.

At first I was thrilled by the novelty. I thought it was a cool concept to buy a stuffed animal and be able to interact with it online. I was so thrilled that I thought it would be cool if I started a blog that would document my experiences with Webkinz. After I started the Adventures in Webkinzland blog, I would take screenshots of my virtual pet doing various things as I continued to earn Kinz Cash so I could buy more stuff so my virtual pet can remain happy.

After a few months of doing this I began to lose interest in Webkinz.com because most of the online activities were very repetitive when doing them on a regular basis. In an effort to regain the original thrill I felt for Webkinz in general, I decided to go to the store and buy a second Webkinz pet, a pink pig. I thought it would be cool to have my two online virtual Webkinz pets living together under the same roof of their virtual home as they socialized together, played together, and just enjoy each other’s company. I remember when I briefly tried playing The Sims a few years earlier and the virtual people in that game would converse with each other and I expected the same with my two Webkinz pets.

Except my two interactive pets basically ignored each other. Even when I had them sit down together at the same table facing each other they looked as if the other pet was invisible or totally nonexistent. That was a total letdown.

By early 2008 I had given up on Webkinz. I developed hip problems that affected my walking so bad that I ended up undergoing a hip replacement later that year. I wrote one final entry in that blog in 2009 that was basically a farewell post that included my final verdict on Webkinz.com.

All in all I wrote a total of 15 posts in that blog—11 in 2007, 3 in 2008, and 1 in 2009. As for the two Webkinz plushies, bookmarks, and trading cards I purchased during my brief flirtation with the Webkinz phenomenon, I have since donated all of it to the American Rescue Workers.

In the years since my brief flirtation with Webkinz, there have been similar toy lines where people buy a certain toy in order to gain access to a website and the person would interact with an online animated version of that toy. There’s American Girl’s Innerstar University, Ty’s Beanie Babies 2.0 and Ty Girls Online, and Build-A-Bear’s Bearville. Since my brief flirtation with Webkinz I haven’t been interested in exploring any other toy/online world combination so I have no idea if these other products are the same or better than Webkinz and I’m not very interested in finding out for sure.

I’ll admit that re-reading my old blog was a trip down memory lane. The entries pre-date my 2008 hip replacement and they were written during a time when I was still happily married. The worst problem I had during that period was when a laptop that my husband and I shared at the time was having problems. There are times when I’m nostalgic for those days because having a problem laptop is nothing compared to the drama I’ve gone through over the last few years.

In any case, check out my brief foray into Webkinz (complete with screenshots of my virtual pets on Webkinz.com) right here.

Yesterday I started my last full day in Florida doing something that’s a bit on the off-beat side. Last week, while I was recuperating from the stomach flu (which was stressful itself because I had to focus on recuperating as much as possible before the trip), this really cute demon doll (a 5 Star Doll Tong Tong) that I ordered a week earlier had arrived. While the doll arrived with shoes and two wigs, she didn’t come with any clothes. The doll was 12 inches tall but she was too big for Barbie clothes. There aren’t any doll shops in my area and normally I had to either order clothes off the Internet, make my own doll clothes, or wait for the very occasional doll convention or meet-up to buy clothes. I managed to hastily make two outfits but they clearly have that look of an outfit that was very quickly and cheaply made.

I really wanted something that was more proper for this doll so I decided to do a Google search on doll shops in the Space Coast/Orlando area and I found at least three shops. I packed my new doll (she didn’t take up too much room in the suitcase) and I decided to go doll clothes shopping during my stay here. Yesterday I attempted to look up one shop only to discover that the provided address was in a residential neighborhood and there were no signage indicating that there’s any active business. (I suspect that the "doll shop" in question may be run out of someone’s home and the owner only sells the inventory at special doll shows.) After that unsuccessful attempt, I moved on to visiting Jungle Adventures Nature Park, which I wrote about yesterday.

Today I decided to try again. This time I decided to try Judy’s Dolls, which is located in Longwood (a suburb that’s located just outside of Orlando’s city limits). When I arrived to the store, I discovered that it’s located in a very quaint and lovely neighborhood that’s full of Victorian-style houses and other types of interesting architecture. I took a few photos of the area, along with the exterior of Judy’s Dolls shop.

Longwood, Florida
Longwood, Florida
Longwood, Florida
Longwood, Florida
Longwood, Florida
Longwood, Florida

Even though it was a long car trip from Indiatlantic (where my current hotel is located) to Longwood, it was a very fruitful because I managed to purchase this really cute doll outfit for my doll. The woman who helped me was excellent. She took one look at the doll and managed to pick out this outfit that she said could probably fit my new doll. When I got back to the hotel last night, I tried the outfit on my doll and it fitted perfectly. (I’ll take some photos of the doll in her new outfit as soon as possible.) The shop also takes online orders so I’ll definitely keep Judy’s Dolls in mind in case I needed to make any more doll-related purchases in the future.

After my visit to Judy’s Dolls, I took a short trip to Downtown Disney where I ate lunch at Wolfgang Puck’s Café, walked along some of the stores and took these shots.

Downtown Disney
Downtown Disney
Downtown Disney
Downtown Disney
Downtown Disney

I also took a photo of the main reason why I went to Downtown Disney today. Here is the exterior of the DisneyQuest building.

DisneyQuest

I’ve long been curious about DisneyQuest. I initially thought that it was little more than a Dave & Buster’s with Disney characters. Well, I was only partially right. While there are plenty of video games (including classic games like Donkey Kong and Pac-Man), there are a few virtual reality attractions that were totally awesome and I really enjoyed them. All of the virtual reality attractions were movie tie-ins, such as a virtual reality simulation of a magic carpet ride that was based on Aladdin.

The coolest part about DisneyQuest was the Creative Zone where people can do things like create their own twisted toys (based on what the character Sid did in the first Toy Story movie). My personal favorite was the 30-minute lesson on how to draw your favorite Disney character. I took the one that gave a lesson on how to draw Minnie Mouse. We drew on this computer screen. At the end of the class, we saved our project and we had the option of purchasing a printed version of our creation for $5. (There was also a more deluxe package for the printed drawing that included a pin that cost $12. I opted for the cheapter $5 package because I really didn’t need a new pin.)

DisneyQuest had an admission fee but all of the videogames were put on "Free Play" mode so you could play as much–let’s say–Space Invaders without having to shell out extra quarters to do so since it was included in the flat admission cost.

All in all it was a pretty fun and laid-back day for me.

Previous Entries

Categories

Advertisements