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How classic cartoons created a culturally literate generation.

People are furious at these new shirts from Kylie and Kendall Jenner.

Kylie Jenner and Khloe Kardashian are accused of stealing ideas from indie African American designers. 

See photographs of figures in Russian history rendered in colorized portraits, such as Tolstoy, Chekhov, and more.

This artist is brining out the beauty in stretch marks.

The rise in art protests: how the gallery became a new battleground.

What it means to be on the left.

Interactive Periodic Table of Elements shows how the elements actually get used in making everyday things.

Someone called this white girl’s Japanese tea party racist on social media but then this Japanese user stepped in.

Gorgeous color autochromes of American women from over 100 years ago.

Creative mom dresses up in amazing cosplay to represent older women characters.

Fender custom shop recycles Hollywood Bowl bench boards to make $12k guitars.

Rural America is stranded in the dial-up age.

Director Michel Gondry makes a charming film on his iPhone, proving that we could be making movies, not taking selfies.

This man spent 6 years crocheting a Super Mario Bros map blanket.

Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals.

Transgender soldiers of the American Civil War.

The 11 most unintentionally hilarious religious paintings.

Meet the unconventional family who lives in a 1940s time warp.

$330,000 in financial aid bought this person a slot in the American meritocracy. He writes about the flaws in that system.

How to get Microsoft Word for free.

What we can learn from the brief period when the government employed artists through its Works Progress Administration (WPA).

Software engineer starts unlikely business: A weekly newspaper.

Russian startup company Renca recycles industrial waste into 3D printable cement.

Can collecting digital art make museums more competitive?

New business fad: Tripping on Ayahuasca.

“Pink Tax” forces women to pay more for gender-specific items than men.

Adobe and IBM are rolling out more artificial intelligence tools for brands.

ISIS recruiting videos hit YouTube after London attack.

Elon Musk wants to merge your brain with a computer.

In the 1970’s this 25-mile-long art project by conceptual artist Christo Javacheff wowed the Bay Area.

A double-amputee toddler gets a doll with prosthetic legs.

Not all animators yearn to direct big studio films.

The disturbing YouTube videos that are tricking children into watching them.

Microsoft Word macro malware automatically adapts attach techniques for Mac OS and Windows.

Little girl mistakes a water heater for a robot and gives it a hug.

Easy Easter crafts that will bring an element of nature to your home.

3D printer helps revive 103-year-old Delage Type-S car.

Virtual anime girl Kizuna Ai rises to fame. She was created using the same software that was used to create virtual pop star Hatsune Miku.

Is YouTube turning against the marginalized community it built its network on?

Italian artists craft the world’s first 24-carat gold-plated shoes that costs ₤21,000 per pair.

The new world of 3D printing and counterfeiting.

Why Piet Mondrian could be considered to be the first digital artist.

Microsoft provided information to the British authorities after the London attack.

Google launches new site to showcase its open source projects and processes.

Open source software is for everyone—so where are the women?

A free tutorial on making a pocket jack-in-the-box in order to keep children occupied while traveling.

New tools makes 3D printed objects look less 3D printed.

How the sudden unexpected fame of the 13-year-old Cash Me Outside How Bow Dah Girl has highlighted the double standard between the way that white teens and teens of other races are treated.

A World War II era photographer in Poland documenting the Lodz Ghetto buried his negatives in 1944 in an effort to preserve his work. After the war he returned to the burial site and and found that more than half of the original 6,000 negatives remained intact.

Viddyoze is a fully automated video animation that allows marketers to create magnificent animations in just a few clicks.

Microsoft’s Top 10 grammar mistakes made in Word and Outlook.

This Lego-compatible tape will turn anything into a Lego-friendly surface.

This self-taught Polish embroiderer’s 3D embroidery creations using polymer clay are one-of-a-kind.

Open source prototype turns any room into a 3D printer.

YouTube takes on Facebook with real-time video sharing app Uptime.

The best free PowerPoint alternatives in 2017.

Just as liberals will go into political correctness, conservative extremists will delve into patriotic correctness.

Retirees knit small sweaters to keep chickens warm and cozy in cold weather.

Adobe’s plan to reinvent itself for the era of AI and VR.

More millennial dads watch parenting videos on YouTube than moms.

Experts say that psychopathic CEOs, enabled by protective investors and weak human resources departments, are rife in Silicon Valley.

Texas woman uses plastic bags to crochet sleeping mats for the homeless.

How the AxiDraw is designed to make handwriting obsolete.

Sixteen months later, YouTube Music is still a missed opportunity.

Uber’s “hustle-oriented” culture becomes a black mark on employees’ resumes.

How to get started with drone photography.

Can Japan make anime great again?

How (and when) to use Microsoft Word footnotes and endnotes.

A New York Times article about the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore, which specializes in art from outsider and self-taught artists.

11 essential DIY supplies and how to use them.

How aging baby boomers who are downsizing or decluttering their art collections have led to a gut in the art market.

What this new A.I. feature in Microsoft Word teaches us about ourselves.

How to make resin-casted shamrock clover coasters.

Syrian children turn to art to process trauma.

Pixar and Khan Academy offer a free online course in storytelling.

Microsoft Office isn’t free but there are free alternatives, including one from Microsoft.

Make shamrock boutonnieres.

A Hungarian baker makes gorgeous embroidery-inspired cookies.

Moroccan designer’s embroidery school revives fading art.

New mapping tools on Excel 2016, including a regular two-dimensional world map.

A list of Microsoft Office alternatives for Mac.

Free printable patterns for making DIY St. Patrick’s Day shirts.

A “Crochet Ninja” is planting free yarn superheroes around New York City.

A crochet group in Qatar is attempting to set the Guinness World Record for making the longest crochet scarf.

Microsoft’s AI is learning to write code by itself, not steal it.

Amazon targets Microsoft’s Office megalith.

Need an easy St. Patrick’s Day craft idea? If you have extra wine corks lying around, you can recycle them by making shamrock stamps.

The world’s first transgender doll will be released later this year.

How YouTube TV will kill cable.

Microsoft PowerPoint will be turning 30 this year. Here’s a look at how it stacks up against other presentation software.

A creepy vein-embedded jewelry that powers your phone with your blood.

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, here’s a free tutorial on how to make an origami shamrock.

I spent this year’s Fourth of July celebrations close to home. (Same as the previous four years since my husband left.) I started the holiday weekend with a visit to Community Forklift, which was having its First Friday event where the store stays open later than usual and there is usually live entertainment, a food truck, and some sales on selected items. There were all kinds of photogenic recycled items on display, as you can see in the photos below.

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Three years ago I painted on a blank canvas bag for my annual church auction. The results looked nice but it was very time consuming to work on because I decided to do a Zentangle background and it turned out to be more time intensive than I expected. It didn’t help that I misjudged how much time would be needed to complete it so I didn’t start the project until about a month before the auction when I really should’ve started it at least three months earlier. (I would’ve kept more sane working hours on that project had I done so.) I literally worked long hours both day and night in order to finish it in time for the auction. The bag was purchased by a longtime church member who has since relocated to St. Louis due to a job transfer.

Until this year I hadn’t done any more personalized canvas tote bags mainly because that last bag had totally burned me out. But this year I decided that I would try it again except I would do things a little bit differently.

First I took the bag to the annual Tye-Dye Sunday that was held at my Unitarian Universalist congregation back in July. Here’s a young girl getting into tie-dyeing at that event.

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I was instructed to take my newly dyed items (I dyed the tote bag and a t-shirt that day), put it in a plastic bag, and put it in direct sunlight for a few hours so it’ll cook. That afternoon I was going to an art event in Washington, DC. Since I had intended to take Metro, I decided to take that plastic bag and put it in the back window of the car so it would be exposed to direct sunlight in 95 degree temperature while I was downtown.

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The dye that was used was manufactured by the Dharma Trading Company. Following the instructions that was posted on that site, I waited until the next day before I untied everything and put it all through the washing machine. Here is what the bag looked like after being tie-dyed.

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I left the bag alone for a while until recently. I looked through my collection of chalice clip art that I could use for this bag. I enlarged the clip art then printed it out on paper. Then I took tracing paper and traced over it. I covered the back of the tracing paper (especially the drawn lines) with a graphite pencil. Then I flipped the paper back to the front and, using pencil, I traced over the paper once again until I had the art on the bag.

After that I took my professional artist-grade acrylic paint and mixed it with GAC-900, which is a fluid medium that is especially used to make the acrylic paint suitable for fabric, and I painted on the bag. Following the instructions on the GAC-900 bottle, I put it through the dryer on high heat in order to set the paint. Here is what the bag looks like now.

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This last shot shows the interior of the bag. As you can see, it is lined on the inside. (The bag was originally purchased with lining on the inside. I did’t make the bag. I only purchased a blank bag and painted on it.)

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I like the results. I have to admit that tie-dyeing the background was way quicker and easier than hand painting Zentangles on the background like I did on that last bag three years ago. I’m hoping that this bag will sell as well at this year’s auction as the last bag did.

For those who are concerned about the environment, this bag is a perfect alternative to using plastic shopping bags that are handed out at most stores. (On top of it, both Montgomery County and the District of Columbia charge an extra five cents per plastic bag in an effort to encourage people to use reusable bags.) It can also be used to carry children’s toys, books, a change of clothes, or anything else that needs carrying.

The auction will be held on November 21 at Paint Branch Unitarian Universalist Church in Adelphi, Maryland. For details and directions, click here.

I know I don’t always write fondly about how I grew up in Glen Burnie, Maryland. For years I only went back to that town to visit my parents. But then my father died and my mother’s MS overwhelmed her so much physically that she couldn’t live in my old childhood home so she moved in with other family members in Odenton so my visits there basically stopped. Last summer I discovered that Crabtowne USA had a collection of vintage arcade games and pinball machines from the late 1970’s-circa 1995. Stepping in that particular room was literally like a step back to my teen years when I used to spend plenty of quarters at the arcade. (At that time, nearly every mall and most of the larger shopping centers had a video arcade.)

Lately I’ve been feeling a desire to make a return to Crabtowne USA for the first time in 2015. (I would’ve gone earlier in the year except there were frequently snowstorms and ice storms and generally nasty cold weather.) The day before Memorial Day fell on a Sunday and I was going to go to worship service at my Unitarian Universalist congregation then help teach the local immigrants how to speak English through my congregation’s social action program to help the local immigrant community. That day was the last day of the spring class so I wanted to be there for that occasion. (That class was originally supposed to end earlier than Memorial Day Weekend but we had to cancel two classes in January because there were ice storms that happened two Sundays in a row.)

Usually I bring a bag lunch with me to eat between the end of the Coffee Hour (the socialization time that immediately follows the end of the worship service) and the beginning of the English class because it’s cheaper than eating at one of the nearby restaurants and fast food places. (These days even many of the fast food places charge at least $10 for a full meal.) Normally I would try to find available space in one of the buildings where Sunday school is held to eat lunch (which is easier said than done some weeks because there is always people using the classrooms for things like a book discussion group or a spirituality circle and there are times when I have to go back to the main building where Sunday service was held so I could sit down and eat my lunch). That last Sunday of class the weather was really lovely. It was warm but not too hot and the humidity was low. I decided to go down into the glen to eat my lunch for a change. There were a couple of other people who were also hanging out there so I managed to talk to them. Here’s a photo I took of the glen.

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About half the students showed up (because it was a holiday weekend) but the session went pretty well. When class finally ended at 3:30 p.m., I was ready to go on a trip to Glen Burnie. Not only did I decide to check out Crabtowne USA but there were a few other things I wanted to check out mainly because they were mentioned on Roadside America.

First I want to mention a few things about Glen Burnie. That town is the kind of town that other people tend to sneer mainly because it’s historically a working class town. The two parallel main roads through that town (Ritchie Highway and Crain Highway) are loaded with car dealerships, shopping malls, and shopping centers. If a developer decides to plop yet another shopping center in a previous open wooded area, you won’t get any protests from the locals or any petition drives calling for slow growth because the people there tend to be a bit apathetic compared to—let’s say—Takoma Park.

There is one area in the town’s northeastern part that’s upscale compared to the rest of Glen Burnie. This area is located along Marley Creek and there are all kinds of nice looking bungalows that look quite cozy. If you have enough money, you could even buy a house whose backyard faces Marley Creek so each day you’ll get picturesque views like this next photograph.

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Unfortunately for me I was among the majority of Glen Burnians who lived in a neighborhood that wasn’t located anywhere near a major body of water. (Most of Glen Burnie is like that, with the exception of that one neighborhood.)

This house I wanted to check out wasn’t among the ones that were directly on the banks of Marley Creek (although the creek is located just a few feet away) but it stands out in other ways that led to it being mentioned on Roadside America. When you first arrive at the house, it looks like a normal cozy neighborhood home until you get a look at the front yard.

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Everywhere you look there are mirrored sculptures. When you look on the ground, you see circle reflections similar to what you’d see in a dark nightclub with a disco ball dangling in the middle of the dance floor. (I tried to photograph the effect but, sadly, it didn’t show up on my camera.)

Since all this mirror looking glass sculptural goodness was on someone’s private property, I initially started taking a few photos with the telephoto function “on.” A next door neighbor saw what I was doing and he told me that it’s okay if I enter the person’s yard and take pictures because the owner doesn’t mind. I saw that the front gate was open so I took the neighbor’s advice and let myself in. The homeowner didn’t emerge. (In fact, I don’t even know if the person was even home at the time.) I quickly saw what the neighbor meant when he encouraged me to let myself in the front yard. The yard is an eclectic mix of mirrors, embedded colored lights in the bushes, and some gorgeous landscaping. Everywhere I went was a total burst of reflection and color.

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It’s definitely worth the trip if you’re ever in Glen Burnie. The neighbor was right about his advice—you need to actually be in the yard in order to get a full sense of what this yard is like. My only advice would be to enter the yard only if the front gate is open because it is still private property. (For the address and directions, visit the Roadside America site.)

After that first visit, I continued on to another place that’s also mentioned on the Roadside America site. It’s known as the Tiny Church for Geese and, like the mirror yard, this one is also located on private property. It’s literally one of those “blink and you’ll miss it” kind of attractions.

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It’s mostly hidden behind a hedge. Since this one is on private property and there were no indications that it’s opened to the general public, I basically used the telephoto feature on my smartphone.

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It looks like the church is in the middle of this island with a moat surrounding it. There is a covered bridge leading to and from the island although if you were a goose or some other bird, you would probably just use your wings instead.

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While I wasn’t able to get a closer look at the structures, the church looked like it would come up to my waist while the covered bridge is a bit shorter.

The only warning I would give about this place is that it’s located on a street that has a very narrow shoulder that barely fits a regular sized four-door passenger car. Also, Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard tends to be traffic-heavy at times so be careful when exiting out the driver’s side of the car. For the address and directions, visit the Roadside America site.

I went on to Crabtowne USA.

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I noticed that the outside of the building has been painted in a different color since my last visit last year. (It used to have a white exterior but it’s now light gray.)

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And there are also a few new promotional posters in the windows.

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There was also a crab statue at the front of the building that I hadn’t seen before.

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I sat at the front counter while taking a close look at the interiors.

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At one point I had to use the bathroom that was near the counter. I was impressed with the bathroom’s decor.

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I especially liked the fact that someone took an old wooden door and reused it as a countertop. Great example of recycling in action.

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I ordered a soft shell crab sandwich and a side order of french fries for dinner. It was very delicious!

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After dinner I made my way over to the arcade. It was still the same as before.

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After I played for a while, I was running low on quarters so I decided to treat myself to dessert. I headed over to Ann’s Dari-Creme, which has been a Glen Burnie institution for decades. The family-owned restaurant specializes in just two things: foot-long hot dogs and ice cream.

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The interior of the place is very small. While there are a few stools where customers can eat, they can frequently get crowded by people waiting for their orders behind them. This is why I have never eaten inside and I only consider eating there if the weather is nice.

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I ordered a chocolate milk shake and it is just as good as my previous trips there.

I finished my trip to Glen Burnie with one final visit to a place that’s also mentioned on Roadside America. This place is located near the neighborhood where I grew up in but this building wasn’t built until long after I left Glen Burnie for good. It’s a dental office with a twist.

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There’s a giant sculpture on the rooftop.

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Roadside America calls it the Giant Rotted Molar Sculpture but, to me, it looks more like a volcano with flowing lava. I can remember when this building first opened it also included an ice cream parlor called Dino-Bites (or something like it) so I assumed that it was a volcano since many dinosaurs were buried under lava thousands of years ago. Even back then there was a dentist office, which I thought was an odd pairing. (Mainly getting some ice cream followed by getting your teeth cleaned and examined.) I’ve driven past this building numerous times over the years and I finally got around to taking a picture of it.

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That’s it for my trip to Glen Burnie! I have to say that even though I enjoyed driving around and checking out the sights, I have zero inclination to move back there. But I will probably continue to visit from time to time as long as Crabtowne USA still has those vintage video arcade games and pinball machines. (LOL!)

http://www.nablopomo.com

UPDATE (December 23, 2015): Here’s some potentially devastating news regarding the church and bridge that were built big enough for geese.

Lately I’ve been planning my garden (if my plans work out, I’ll definitely write a future post about it) so I took a trip to Behnke’s Nurseries in Beltsville, Maryland. I saw this really cute display where people can plan a fairy garden for either indoors or outdoors.

Fairy Garden Display

Fairy Garden Display

Fairy Garden Display

Fairy Garden Display

Fairy Garden Display

There were not only fairy cottages and fairy benches but also fairy campers and a fairy henhouse for fairy-sized chickens.

Fairy Garden Display

Fairy Garden Display

I took a photo of this lovely aquatic garden display.

Aquatic Garden Plants

I also saw this incredible example of recycling old items for use in a garden. It’s a filing cabinet that’s been converted for tiered gardening in small spaces.

Creative Use of Recycling

http://www.nablopomo.com

Free Tutorials

While there are lots of great software out there (including both proprietary and open source), sadly there are a lack of manuals that can explain how to use the software that are written in a clear concise manner that doesn’t assume that you are already an expert. This article on Opensource.com has some tips on how to write a software manual that’s easy to follow for the end user which can easily be applied to other types of situations (like writing instructions on how to knit a sweater, for example).

A tool wrap, house slippers, and other things you can make from a pair of worn-out blue jeans.

Browse other free tutorials previously mentioned in this blog (along with pictures) right here.

Miscellaneous Links

This has got to be the coolest use of 3D printed technology yet. Mat Collishaw and Sebastian Burton collaborated together to create a 3D printed zoetrope that does an animated reproduction of Peter Paul Reubens’ Baroque painting Massacre of the Innocents with very impressive results.

Here are some gorgeous Edwardian Era photographs of two girls that were actually shot in color between 1910-1914.

8 Ways Privatization Has Failed America

America’s elites are leaving it to die: TPP, Baltimore, Amtrak & the deteriorating fabric of a nation

Back in 2004 the spouse of an employee at the video game maker Electronic Arts wrote a blog post about what it’s like to be in a relationship with someone who works for a company that constantly demands its employees to work 12 hour days, six days a week. That post hit such a raw nerve with people that it quickly went viral for a while. Sadly it seems like not much has changed in the video game industry since that blog post first went live, according to this article titled The Horrible World Of Video Game Crunch.

Free Tutorials

27 Insanely Clever Crafts You Can Make With Cardboard

Browse other free tutorials previously mentioned in this blog (along with pictures) right here.

Miscellaneous Links

Here’s a look at the world’s first $9 computer. (And, no, it’s not a typo. This computer actually costs $9.)

Since Mother’s Day is tomorrow, I’d thought I’d provide a link that may help some mothers (and non-mothers, fathers, and non-fathers as well) who are currently in a very less than ideal marriage or relationship. It’s the Power and Control Wheel and it was originally created by the Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs in Duluth, Minnesota.

Tired of constantly hearing about what Kim Kardashian or a member of her extended family is up to? Could you care less about Kim and her clan and would rather read about something more important (such as the recent earthquake in Nepal or the violent protests in Baltimore)? Someone has come up with a new app called KardBlock whose function is very simple. It’ll censor any mention of Kim Kardashian and/or members of her family that pops up on any newsfeed or any website you visit. That sounds like a great solution for those who are simply sick of hearing about the Kardashian clan. The new app is currently in beta but this website is offering people the opportunity to have exclusive beta access to what the website describes as “the best thing to happen to the internet since the Kardashians.”

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