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I currently have a work of art on display at the latest artist exhibition that’s currently going on at Paint Branch Unitarian Universalist Church in Adelphi, Maryland. Here’s is my piece.

Here is my piece as it is currently displayed inside of the church.

To learn more about how I created this piece, you can see the blog post I wrote on September 12, 2018.

After service last Sunday there was a reception for this exhibit where they basically served light food like baba ganoush with crackers along with fruit and vegetables. Here are a couple photos I took of the reception.

The art show is continuing through sometime next month. (I’m not sure of the date but I’ll definitely post it here when I get more information.) For more information about this exhibit, see the official website.

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Way back in 2015 I took a trip to a place called The Museum of Outdated Technology. I first learned about this place on the Roadside America site but, for some reason, that site has since removed all references to this place. (Other sites like Atlas Obscura and Roadside Wonders still lists this place.)

At the time I was working this job that was in Bethesda and the day I went to The Museum of Outdated Technology was the last day of that gig so I decided to go to this particular museum (which is actually located in the back of the Wagging Tails Thrifts & Gifts thrift store). I wanted to do something fun to celebrate the end of a very stressful gig and I was in the area anyway so it was no big deal to make the short commute to this place from what was now my former workplace. I took a bunch of photos and wrote a blog post about it. I haven’t been back to this place since mainly because the museum in question is so small that it’s really not worth making a special trip to visit and I haven’t really gone back to that particular area of Rockville that would warrant me making a repeat visit to that museum.

Moving forward to 2018, I had spent the bulk of my Labor Day holiday weekend at the Greenbelt Labor Day Festival. I had a fun time but the only major flaw was weather-related. For the most part the temperature was not only very humid but it had reached in the low-90’s, which made walking around outdoors a major challenge. I tried staying in air conditioned buildings as much as possible but there were times when I got totally overheated.

Well, anyway, Labor Day was a very hazy, hot, and humid day with full sunshine so walking around the fairgrounds was like a literal hell on earth. I left the festival as soon as I could and I returned home only to remember that I hadn’t turned on the air conditioner before I left this morning so my home felt like a sauna. I decided to drive to a nearby air conditioned mall where I could cool down until twilight. I ended up eating a $5 chicken sandwich at the new Z Burger place that had opened at that mall a few months ago. At one point I looked on my phone where I saw this email from a total stranger named Donald:

From: Donald

Subject: Museum of Outdated Technology

Are you open today?

I can understand why he was asking because it was a major holiday and there were plenty of places that were either closed or on very limited hours. I was totally dumbfounded by the fact that he had sent this email to me. I know I had once visited this place and I wrote one blog post about it but anyone who read it would know that I had absolutely nothing to do with this place. I don’t know how he came to equate me with that place. Today I did a Google search on the Museum of Outdated Technology and I found that my original 2015 blog post does come up in the top four results. But if he had taken the time to thoroughly read that blog post, he would’ve known that I had no connection to it. I don’t know if he had read my blog post or not but if he did, it’s obvious that reading comprehension is not his strong suit.

As I read that original email message today, I realized that he had sent it at 10 a.m. but I didn’t check my email until after 5 p.m. because I was so busy with the Greenbelt Labor Day Festival. If I had to do this all over again and if my mind had been more rational without being exposed to constant heat and humidity, I would’ve just deleted this email and not even bothered with answering it. But I was pretty overheated from spending most of the day in 90 degree humid weather and I was pretty tired so I admit that my judgment and common sense went out the window. I decided to answer this guy where I sent this message:

From: Kim

Subject: Re: Museum of Outdated Technology

Why are you emailing this to me? I have never worked in this place. I don’t know if they are open. I suggest doing a Google search for the phone number that you can call.

Minutes later I received this email from Donald:

From: Donald

Subject: Re: Museum of Outdated Technology

So is that a yes?

It wasn’t until the next day I realized that he had sent his original email at 10 a.m. on Labor Day. I didn’t see it until after 5 p.m. because I was busy with the festival. I sent him my reply yet he sent his reply asking if this place was open even though it was past 5 p.m. and there was a strong chance that if that place was open on Labor Day, it would’ve been closed by now since many places tend to have limited operating hours on Labor Day. (In fact, while I was at the local mall trying to escape the intense heat I saw that many of the smaller businesses were in the process of closing at 6 p.m. because of the holiday.) I was tired and overheated so my temper and patience was far shorter than usual. In total exasperation I sent this email:

From: Kim

Subject: Re: Museum of Outdated Technology

I can’t answer that question. I have ZERO connection with this place. Please stop emailing me.

I know I sounded harsh but, you’d think that Donald would get the message that I’m someone who had no connection to that place other than the fact that I wrote a blog post about it back in 2015. But he still wouldn’t let it go.

From: Donald

Subject: Re: Museum of Outdated Technology

Do you know who I could ask?

I felt so frustrated by this point. Here I am repeatedly letting this guy know that I have no connection with this place yet he seems to think that I somehow have all kinds of connections to this place. I have never been employed by the thrift shop that operates the Museum of Outdated Technology in any kind of capacity and I don’t know anyone who works there. I had only visited this place one time and that was back in 2015. I have only written one blog post about it. I haven’t been back since and I haven’t even given much thought to this place since my one and only visit. I decided to just send one more email then let it go because it was so obvious that this guy is too stupid and thick-headed to understand that I have no connection of any kind to the Museum of Outdated Technology.

From: Kim

Subject: Re: Museum of Outdated Technology

No, I don’t know.

That was my last response to Donald. I haven’t heard back from him since yesterday and I’m hoping it stays that way. If he starts emailing me again about the Museum of Outdated Technology, I’m just going to block him because I don’t need this annoyance from a complete stranger.

If Donald or anyone else is interested in the Museum of Outdated Technology, here’s the information I found today through Google that you can use to contact these people with whatever questions you happen to have:

Museum of Outdated Technology
c/o Wagging Tails Thrifts & Gifts
1310 E. Guide Drive
Rockville, Maryland 20850
Phone: (301) 279-0345
Email: itercy@mchumane.org
Website: www.mchumane.org/support/thrift-store/

Now that I’ve posted this information, I’m going to announce that I will not answer any further emails about the Museum of Outdated Technology because I’m the wrong person you should be asking.

I was born in Baltimore. I lived there for the first five years of my life until my family decided to move to Glen Burnie. It was there where the kids called me “retarded,” a label that started in elementary school and it literally stuck with me all through high school and even during my freshman year at Anne Arundel Community College. It was during my freshman year I realized that the students who went to other high schools treated me like I was a human being while the students who went to my high school continued to look down on me as if they wished my mother had sought an illegal abortion when she was pregnant with me. Those students were a major factor in my decision to transfer to the University of Maryland at College Park a year earlier than I originally planned. The students there treated me like I was a person and not some “ugly retarded” misfit.

After I finished my education in College Park I moved back in with my parents in Glen Burnie for 10 months until I got married. My new husband had purchased a townhouse closer to Washington, DC so I was only happy to move there. The people I’ve met since then tend to treat me like I was a human being because they had not grown up in Glen Burnie so they weren’t aware of my misfit reputation that other people had bestowed upon me. I managed to make some real friends over the years and I’m way happier where I am now than I would have been had I remained in Glen Burnie.

I was fortunate that I was given a chance to escape from Glen Burnie that others don’t have. As I’m typing this, I’m thinking about this transgender person known alternatively as Kesha Girl Dale, Britney Girl Dale, and Madonna Girl Dale, who lives in Brooklyn Park (located just north of Glen Burnie) and who frequently dresses in flashy outfits that are sometimes on the skimpy side as she frequently struts down Route 2 from Baltimore to Brooklyn Park to Glen Burnie and she sometimes goes as far south as Pasadena. Here are a few photos I shot of her in Baltimore at the May Day protest against the police killing of Freddie Gray back in 2015.

The Protesters March Along Gay Street

The Protesters March Along Gay Street

The Protesters March Along Gay Street

The Protesters March Along Gay Street

The Protesters March Along Gay Street

I’ve read a few interviews she’s done (like this one) and, like me she’s a white person who had to endure being mistreated by others but, unlike me, she hasn’t been able to escape from that area so she copes with her lot in life by dressing as Madonna and strutting down the streets with her boombox loaded with Madonna CDs in tow as she dances her way through the Baltimore/Brooklyn Park/Glen Burnie/Pasadena area. Some of the locals are outraged that she does this and there have been online petitions in the past in an effort to get the police to somehow crack down on her. I laugh whenever she ignores those haters and keeps on doing what she’s been doing because those haters are the same kind of people who used to treat me as if I was retarded and they looked down on me as if I should have never existed in the first place. Those people definitely deserve to have Madonna Girl Dale dance in their faces.

Every now and then I see stories that have only reminded me that I made the right decision when I moved away from Glen Burnie years ago. One example was this incident a few years ago where a former police officer thought it would be a good idea to have a fundraiser in Glen Burnie for the cops who were implicated in the death of Freddie Gray by having him perform as Al Jolson wearing blackface. The whole Baltimore Uprising in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death came about as a result of long-simmering racial issues and this white guy wanted to perform in blackface in nearby Glen Burnie. Fortunately the venue where this fundraiser was going to be held decided to cancel that event because the owner just didn’t want to deal with potential race riots erupting outside of his business while some white guy inside his place was performing in blackface. Besides if that concert had gone on as planned, his venue would’ve gained a reputation as a place that’s friendly to alt-right white nationalist groups, which would’ve led to boycotts and things like that.

Well there’s a more recent event where Glen Burnie is in the news and it’s not very flattering. Here’s some background: Twenty-five years ago Baltimore put up its light rail line that begins at Hunt Valley (located north of Baltimore) then it winds its way through Baltimore City before it comes out through the south end along Patapsco, Linthicum, and Glen Burnie before it finally ends at BWI Airport. I’ve ridden that light rail numerous times over the years because parking in the Inner Harbor is so expensive while a light rail pass costs around $3.60 and I can use it all day and I can take as many rides as I want. (The pass expires around 3 a.m. the next day.) I’ve grown to love the light rail because it’s cheap to ride.

Last year I tried riding the light rail to the German Festival that was held at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Lutherville-Timonium instead of driving along the Baltimore Beltway and I liked it better. The driving along the major highways in the Baltimore-Washington, DC area have gotten horrendous in recent years with frequent speeding, tailgating, and all kinds of road rage garbage. I’ve had so many near-misses regarding accidents that it’s not even funny. In contrast, taking the light rail took the stress out of driving. I could even read a book on the light rail, which is something I can’t do when I’m driving.

Last month there was a huge amount of rain that fell in the Baltimore-Washington area. The rain was so bad that it damaged some of the tracks in northern Anne Arundel County, which includes Glen Burnie. The officials decided to temporarily close the affected light rail stations in that area while repairing the tracks.

So that sounds pretty uneventful. Until I started seeing stories where some of the residents in Anne Arundel County wanted to have the light rail shut down permanently. WHAT THE FUCK?!?

The argument is that ever since the light rail has been build 25 years ago, there have been an increase in criminals who use that light rail to commute from Baltimore to Patapsco, Linthicum, and Glen Burnie in order to commit murder, rape, and robbery then hop back on the light rail to their Baltimore homes.

Except if you look at the data, you’d see that it’s not even true. As this one story puts it:

County police Chief Tim Altomare recently told CBS Baltimore, “There’s a fear that crime comes down on the Light Rail. I don’t think if you look statistically, that there’s any great number of crimes that are generating off Light Rail stops, but there is a clear and convincing feeling of fear about it.”

The same story continues:

To recap: we have people lobbying their elected officials to fix a problem all evidence shows does not actually exist. Those elected officials are listening to them, even though they too know the problem does not exist.

Meanwhile, society continues to make movies, write songs, and play video games about all the ways we use cars to commit crimes. Yet for some reason, no one suggests tearing down highways for the crimes they might encourage.

The Baltimore Sun have also weighed in with this:

If the push by Anne Arundel County residents and elected officials to shut down several light rail stations north of BWI-Marshall Airport is really about crime, we ask this: Where’s the evidence? County Executive Steve Schuh’s office admits there is no crime wave associated with the light rail, even as he appeals to the Department of Transportation to curtail service. County police have been patrolling the trains in recent months, boarding more than 1,000 times since April to yield a whopping three arrests and 14 fare violations.

On the contrary, when we hear County Councilman John Grasso haul out the old suburban saw that “drug addicts, crooks, thieves” use the light rail to “go out there, rob the people, hop on the train back to Baltimore City,” it sounds a lot like President Donald Trump’s claim that Mexico is “sending” drug dealers and rapists across our southern border.

I’m shaking my head at this. I’m not denying that there’s crime in Baltimore. That city has long had a long host of social problems due to a bunch of reasons that would take another blog post to explain in full detail. I’m also not denying that some people may have had less-than-thrilling encounters while riding the light rail. But I find it interesting that it’s the people in the Glen Burnie area who are clamoring the most about the crime that the light rail has brought to their area while Hunt Valley and other places north of Baltimore who are also serviced by the same light rail system have been silent about how the light rail have affected crime in those areas. I mean, if the criminals are willing to hop on the south bound light rail to rob those suburban folks in Glen Burnie, it would be logical for them to hop on the same light rail system going northbound so they could conduct their heinous crimes in Owings Mills and Hunt Valley.

I’m not surprised that this kind of shit is going on in Glen Burnie. That town is full of small-minded people who just don’t hesitate to look down on you if you look or act slightly different. I’m a white female of northern European descent, the kind of person who would blend in easily in Glen Burnie except I got pegged as “retarded” by the other kids starting in elementary school and it didn’t let up until I finally moved away from that place.

But now I’m seeing that this story has reached the foreign media. I saw a story in the British newspaper The Guardian about that protest and I find it totally embarrassing as someone who grew up in that town. I have to congratulate Glen Burnie and the other towns in that area for now being recognized for what they really are: a collection of small-minded assholes. At least a would-be European tourist who is thinking about visiting America won’t be putting Glen Burnie on his/her itinerary.

These people are so steeped in their prejudices that they refuse to even look at the facts. Here is an excerpt from that Guardian story:

Chris and Kim Hahn knew something was wrong when their dog started growling at the back door after midnight in March 2017. Chris went to investigate and found a man crouching near the pool. He confronted the man, who Chris thought appeared to be on drugs, and a violent altercation ensued. The intruder was left bleeding.

“I don’t know what he was up to,” said Chris, recalling the event more than a year later with Kim in the kitchen of their neat Glen Burnie home.

The Hahns had moved to the working/middle-class suburb seeking a quiet, safe environment away from the crime and strife of Baltimore, 10 miles away. But, like many in the neighbourhood, they say the city’s woes have seeped into the area via public transport. Specifically, they believe criminals are coming into the suburbs by light rail.

Data does not bear that out, but that hasn’t stopped some residents from campaigning for the service, which started 25 years ago, to be reduced. The Hahns have just returned from a protest demanding the closure of a light rail stop around the corner from their home – a stop activists have linked to an increase in crime in the area.

“Looking at his rap sheet or whatever, he was from Baltimore city,” Kim said of the intruder. “He missed the light rail and had to find a place to stay, and he chose to climb our fence.”

The Anne Arundel county police confirmed the details of the Hahns’ report, but with two important discrepancies: there was nothing to link the suspect with the light rail and he wasn’t from Baltimore – he was local.

He hadn’t missed the light rail back to the city that night. He was from Anne Arundel county, just like the Hahns.

I don’t understand why the Hahns can’t get it into their heads that this guy was from the same area where they currently live. I had to accept the fact that there were people in Glen Burnie who are less-than-ethical and are even violent. I’ve written before about that middle school bully who wrote something nasty in my yearbook without my permission just a day or two before school ended for the year. That girl who did this didn’t live in Baltimore. In fact, she would have never been allowed to enroll in that middle school had she lived in Baltimore because that whole city would’ve been outside of that school’s jurisdiction. She was a Glen Burnie girl just like I was.

That same Guardian article mentioned that Anne Arundel County has been hit hard by the opioid epidemic and Glen Burnie has been suffering numerous heroin fatalities. The Baltimore Sun has mentioned that most of the drug addicts in Anne Arundel County actually live in Anne Arundel County—not Baltimore.

I’m not surprised that there are drugs in Glen Burnie. There were drugs in Glen Burnie when I was growing up. I used to see kids smoking pot in homemade bongs whenever I took the wooded shortcut while I was walking to my high school. I knew a girl who used to drop LSD and she even took that drug once when we took a trip to King’s Dominon that was organized by my Catholic church’s CCD group. The adults who lived there just stuck their heads in the sand while thinking that they had rescued their kids from a life of becoming drug users in Baltimore City. (LOL!)

I still remember when the adults were shocked that three little girls were brutally murdered in Glen Burnie. There were people who said that this is the kind of thing that happens in Baltimore, not Glen Burnie. The teen who did this also grew up in Glen Burnie just like his victims.

Yes, there are drugs and crime in Glen Burnie and the drug addicts and criminals are also from Glen Burnie. The sooner people start to see the reality and start working on possible solutions to these two social issues, the better Glen Burnie could become. Otherwise, Glen Burnie is destined to remain a town whose biggest claim to fame that a couple of episodes of the 1970s TV show Movin’ On were filmed there. Closing down the light rail is the wrong solution to a real problem.

As for me, I’m still glad I got out of Glen Burnie. Thanks to this latest drama, I’m going to start telling people that I came from Baltimore instead of Glen Burnie. (It wouldn’t be a total lie since I was born there and I lived there until I was five years old.) I’ve been spending the bulk of my adult like putting Glen Burnie behind me so it’s no big deal to tell people that I’m from Baltimore. If you read some other blog posts I’ve previously written about the people in Glen Burnie, you’d see that I’ve been doing it all along.

Visiting My Mother and Seeing Donald Trump Signs in Glen Burnie, Maryland

Throwback Thursday: Baltimore, Glen Burnie, and Me

I’ve Put My High School Days Behind Me and I Don’t Want to Go Back Again

My Old School, July 11, 2016

Another Reason Why I’m Glad I No Longer Have Any Connection With My Hometown

Two Bitches From Hell

My Brief Visit to My Hometown of Glen Burnie, July 1, 2017

The boss at my current day job decided to spend a large chunk of August in India with his family (where they originally came from). No, I’m not getting paid while he’s in India visiting members of his extended family who still live there. (Without going into details, let’s just say that I’ve been working for this guy for over four months and not only have my hours not increased to full-time work, despite his assurances that it would eventually happen, but they have gotten increasingly erratic.) I took a one-day offer to do some side work for a friend of mine while he’s working at his day job in Takoma Park, Maryland.

The annual National Night Out happened to be taking place on that same day and it’s near where my friend works so my friend and I decided to head over to that event to check it out. I’ve attended the National Night Out events in Greenbelt (and I even wrote a blog post about it back in 2016) so I was okay with seeing how a different town observes that event. I took some photos as well.

The event was held in the parking lot outside of Piney Branch Elementary School (which was closed for summer vacation). The police closed down the street that went past the school.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

The police and other local community groups gave away free food and drinks. I managed to eat a hot dog and a hamburger for dinner.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

A local television station was covering this event.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

MacGruff the Crimefighting Dog was there greeting people and having his picture taken with them.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

There were all kinds of activities for people of all ages to do, including playing with a giant chess set, playing with a giant Jenga tower, petting a police horse, and playing various games. A deejay was there spinning the tunes while all this was happening. Everyone present seemed to have a good time.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

There was even a “Dunk-A-Cop” game where kids could throw balls to soak a cop.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

There was a petition drive to recall the Takoma Park City Council. I don’t know what the issue was about nor did I bother to find out because I don’t live in Takoma Park.

National Night Out, August 7, 2018

Here’s a video of the event, which I helped to shoot and edit using a friend’s iPodTouch. I played around with the slow-motion features of this camera during the jump rope footage, which was pretty interesting when I viewed it later.

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Not too long ago I happened to be at a Megamart, which is located in an area of Adelphi, Maryland that’s dominated by Latino immigrants. I saw these religious statues at the front of the store that I couldn’t resist photographing.

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A few weeks earlier I wrote a blog post about some interesting art on the walls of my Unitarian Universalist congregation that was done by a local self-taught artist named Antonio Moore. More recently the church held an artist reception for Moore immediately following the weekly Sunday service.

As part of the artist reception Moore gave a live demonstration of his painting style. Here are a couple of photos.

I also shot this short video os his painting demonstration.

Here’s the finished product.

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I happened to be visiting a friend at his job in Takoma Park when I saw a recently finished painting project. Someone had painted the steps that are located outside of the Takoma Park Community Center in a variety of rainbow colors. In addition, it had a bunch of sayings in a variety of foreign languages that all had to do with rise, rising, rise up, or rising up. (Takoma Park is home to a huge number of immigrants who hail from countries in Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.)

I wrote a previous blog post about those steps. More recently I was visiting the same friend at his workplace when I saw that the painting project was finished. I decided to climb up those steps while taking these pictures.

I saw that the top of the steps led to an elementary school, which is currently closed for summer vacation.

Here’s a view of Takoma Park itself from the top of the steps.

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I had a pretty busy Sunday on July 15, 2018. I went carpooling with one friend to church where there was a Tye-Dye Sunday scheduled. By the time I got home from church I turned around and went carpooling with a different friend to this meetup that took place in Rockville.

CoderDojo is basically a global network that provides free computer programming clubs to young people. My friend thought it would be good for me to check this out, especially since I worked as an assistant facilitator with the Takoma Park chapter of Girls Who Code over the past year.

The Washington, DC chapter of CoderDojo meets at the Rockville Public Library in Rockville, Maryland. I had never stepped foot inside this building before but I have to admit that it’s very impressive.

There was an art show going on featuring art done by local youths. It brought back memories of the first time my elementary school art teacher had selected one of my art projects to be shown at the Anne Arundel County Art Show that was displayed at the since-demolished Harundale Mall.

The CoderDojo met in a room on the second floor of the library, which is a designated STEM center. That room had an array of all kinds of stuff that one would normally find in a makerspace (such as computers and robots) but there was some pretty cool STEM-themed art as well.

The meeting started off with a presentation about what computing was like back in the 1990s (when the Computer Internet revolution was just beginning). I enjoyed it because I remember those days like they happened yesterday. There was a mention of using modems attached to telephone wires in order to access the Internet at a blistering 9600 bps.

I enjoyed the presentation very much. Once that ended, the kids started to work on their own projects while parents and other adult volunteers went around helping the kids with their latest projects.

By the time that meetup ended it was closing time for the library. My friend and I were heading back towards the parking garage by cutting through Rockville Town Square when I shot this photo of some kids playing in the fountain.

I also discovered that there was an It’s Sugar store located in Rockville. I had previously visited It’s Sugar in Baltimore and Chinatown in Washington, DC and I managed to convince my friend to stop in the Rockville store for a brief visit, where I shot these photos.

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I arrived at church with a friend (we were carpooling together) when we saw that it was once again Tye-Dye Sunday. This is an event that’s usually held once a year during the summer. It runs in place of regular Sunday school for the kids while adults have a chance to dye their own shirts once Sunday service ends. Here are a few photos I took at that event.

I had somehow missed the memo about Tye-Dye Sunday so I didn’t bring any blank t-shirts from home. There were a few blank t-shirts lying around but the bulk were too small for me. But then I discovered this one t-shirt that was very stretchy so it could fit me. What’s more, it’s a Michael Kors designer t-shirt. I don’t know who donated that t-shirt. It was a basic blank white shirt that would have been indistinguishable from other white shirts if I hadn’t seen that label.

I took that shirt for myself, tied rubber bands around it, then put it in this vat of purple dye.

I put the shirt in a zip-lock bag then took it home with me. The following day I washed it and it looked okay. While my t-shirt was drying I decided to take a trip to the local mall and I was walking around Jo-Ann’s Fabrics & Crafts. I saw this unicorn iron-on appliqué with a color scheme that would definitely match my newly-dyed Michael Kors t-shirt. I also have the Jo-Ann’s app on my smartphone so I was able to use a coupon and pay just $2.50 for that appliqué. Sweet!

So I ironed that appliqué patch on the t-shirt once it fully dried. Here is the front of the shirt.

The next photo show the back of the t-shirt.

And, last but not least, here’s a selfie of me modeling that t-shirt.

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Last month I happened to be visiting a friend at his job in Takoma Park, Maryland when I learned that there was a community fish fry that was taking place outside the Takoma Park Community Center. People were giving away free fish meals to anybody while a deejay played the tunes. In addition, there was a table full of free clothes that were available for the taking. I ended up with a nice suit that’s more suitable for the winter since it’s made from heavy fabric. But it will come in handy for whatever office job I get in the future.

As for the food, it was pretty good. I hadn’t had seafood in a long while so eating this fish felt like a total godsend.

I shot some video footage of the community fish fry, which you can view below.

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