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Ramadan

Before I got my current day job doing administrative work for the executor of his late aunt’s estate, I had done some volunteer work as an assistant facilitator for the Takoma Park, Maryland chapter of Girls Who Code, a nationwide organization that is dedicated to encourage girls to become comfortable with technology so they will feel emboldened to enter computer science and other STEM related fields as women. This chapter met two afternoons a week after school in the computer lab at the Takoma Park Public Library (that’s the one that’s located on the Maryland side of town—there’s another Takoma Park Public Library that’s located on the Washington, DC side and is part of the DC Public Library system).

I ended up having to drop out when I had a serious car problem earlier this year (the brakes died and I couldn’t afford to get them repaired immediately) followed by getting my current day job. I helped with editing this video about what the girls did during their time with Girls Who Code. (Other people had shot video footage and photos.)

The video that I edited was shown during the graduation ceremony that was held last week. Unfortunately I had to miss it because of my day job but the ceremony was initially live-streamed over the Internet and it’s now archived on YouTube.

I recently wrote a new article on LinkedIn Pulse about my experience with Girls Who Code called “How I’ve Personally Seen Girls Who Code Change Lives,” which you can read right here.

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Recently this unusually nasty wind storm went through my area that was known alternatively as a Noreaster or a Bomb Cyclone. It produced winds that were so strong that the federal government was closed down along with the area public schools and many businesses. The National Weather Service advised people to not even attempt to travel unless it was an emergency.

I had a job interview that was scheduled for that very day and I was dreading the prospect of driving in that weather since it’s challenging to drive my car in high winds. Fortunately the place I was interviewing at had decided to postpone the interview for the following week so I didn’t have to worry about driving at all. At one point I managed to take a walk in the wind where I shot this short video showing how windy it really got.

I also shot a few still photos of the effect that the ultra-windy weather had on the great outdoors. I submitted my photos to the local community newspaper known as The Greenbelt News Review, two of them were actually published in last week’s issue. That link is to a .PDF document. One of my photos was published on the front page. The other one can be found by scrolling down to page 8.

Here are the other photos I shot that didn’t make it to publication. The first two photos show a tree that fell in someone’s backyard.

The petals of the blooming crocus flowers had shut themselves due to the wind.

The Greenbelt Makerspace maintains a Little Free Library, which sustained damage when the wind blew off one of its doors.

The American flags that were recently placed at the Veterans Memorial for the Presidents’ Day holiday were literally flying straight because of the wind.

The tree that was brightly lit by the sun made a dramatic contrast with the dark grey clouds.

A wood chipper was set up to help remove the fallen branches and other tree debris that fell as a result of the high winds.

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January 20 was the one-year anniversary of the inauguration of Donald Trump while the following day would be the one-year anniversary of the Women’s March on Washington. (Ironically the Federal Government also shut down on that same day but it would reopen three days later.) The organizers decided to hold another Women’s March that would take place in cities throughout the United States. (There were other Women’s Marches that took place in other countries as well. One of my Facebook friends attended one in her hometown of Montreal.)

This year’s Women’s March on Washington was different in some ways. Last year the DC march was the main march and people from all over the U.S. and came to DC. It drew famous people to that march like Madonna, Ashley Judd, and Alicia Keys. This year the main focal point of the march was being held in Las Vegas, where the organizers spent Saturday (January 20) holding a conference with the theme of “Power to the Polls” (this year is the mid-term elections where plenty of Senate and House seats are up for grabs) while spending the following day (January 21) marching on the streets to commemorate the anniversary of the 2017 march. Las Vegas was chosen as the main march for this year because it is a swing state in the upcoming elections.

There was definitely a difference between this year’s march and last year’s march. Last year I remember going to a Metro station on the Sunday before that march so I could take advantage of the free parking on the weekends (Metro charges people to park during the week regardless of whether you actually ride the subway or not) and the usual light crowds to add more fare to my SmartTrip card so I wouldn’t have to stand in a very long line on the day of the march. This year I forgot to do this and I wasn’t willing to pay the $5.20 weekday parking fee just so I could increase my SmartTrip farecard. I took my chances and saw that the lines were pretty short this year and I had no problem with adding fare to my card on the day of the march itself.

Last year a group of women from my church decided to go and we agreed to meet very early in the morning in order to be able to beat the expected crowd. This year there were no organized effort from my church to march together. I had planned on getting there on my own by about 7 a.m. except I had a hard time getting to sleep that night due to the fact that I gorged myself with too much cake at this party that was held at my church the night before so I woke up later than I intended.

The one thing that remained the same is that I wore the same Grumpy Cat hat that I wore last year. Apparently there was some controversy about wearing those knitted pink pussycat hats last year on the grounds that they trivialize the serious issues regarding sexism and feminism. This year there’s controversy about the hats because the pussy hats are supposed to represent women’s pussies and the color pink is supposed to represent the color of the vagina. Except the hats could be offensive to transgender and non-binary women who may not have the usual pussy and it could also be offensive to women of color, whose vaginas tend to be more brown-colored than pink.

On top of it, I never got around to knitting my own pink pussycat hat mainly because I was more focused on knitting other hats in a variety of colors for my church’s annual mittens and hats sale late last year. So I wore Grumpy Cat on my head once again. In a way it’s appropriate because I’m grumpy about politics these days plus I’ve learned that the real life Grumpy Cat is actually female. (Which explains why actress Aubrey Plaza was hired to do the voice of Grumpy Cat in the movie Grumpy Cat’s Worst Christmas Ever.) Here are a couple of selfies wearing that hat after I reached the rally in downtown DC.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

The weather was even better this year. Last year it had rained in the area for the past few days prior to the march and it had even rained on Inauguration Day. Even though it didn’t rain on the day of the march, the sky was still very gloomy with the clouds out and the ground was incredibly wet. I remember it was cold as well so I wore my heavy winter coat. This year it was sunny and the latest below-freezing cold temperatures that had been plaguing our area for the past few days had finally left our area the day before. On the day of the march the temperature went up to the 50’s so I decided to wear a lighter jacket instead of my heavy winter coat.

Another difference I noticed between this year and last year is that I didn’t see any signs touting Hillary Clinton nor did I see anyone cart any life-sized Hillary Clinton standees. I think the march participants have moved on and decided to just focus on President Trump and the upcoming mid-term elections.

Like last year I took a bunch of pictures, which I’ve posted here. Unlike last year, I managed to shoot a short video of the event at various points of that march, which you can view right here.

The rest of this post has the still photos I shot that day along with my personal descriptions and opinions of that event.

So I woke up late that morning and I wasn’t finally out the door until 10 a.m. I was nervous about how crowded the Greenbelt Metro station would be until I arrived there and I found that I had no problem with finding a parking space. I also found that there were almost no lines to speak of. There was just one fellow protester stationed at the Metro entrance who was greeting people.

Women's March on Washington 2018

The Metro subway train wasn’t very crowded and I managed to find a seat. Since I heard that this year’s rally was being held further down the Mall at the Reflecting Pool next to the Lincoln Memorial, I got off at the Foggy Bottom Metro station. (I learned years ago that Foggy Bottom is the closest station to the Lincoln Memorial because you’ll end up doing less walking than getting off at the Smithsonian Metro and walking down the entire length of the Mall. I saw plenty of march participants get off at the Smithsonian station while I knew that they had a very long walk ahead of them. LOL!)  When I got out of that station the first thing I saw were the merchants outside the Foggy Bottom Metro station who were hawking Women’s March-related wares (including t-shirts, buttons, and even pink pussycat hats).

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Two men were playing chess while people were doing other things around them like vendors selling merchandise and protesters buying merchandise and walking towards the Lincoln Memorial.

Women's March on Washington 2018

I purchased three buttons from a vendor who was having a three buttons for $10 sale. I pinned them to the back of my Grumpy Cat hat.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

While walking down 23rd Street, NW, I encountered a mix of protesters lining the street with their signs. I also saw more vendors selling their wares every block or so between the Foggy Bottom Metro station and the Lincoln Memorial.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

I finally reached the Lincoln Memorial where I saw protesters with their signs.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Anti-abortion protesters tried to stage a counter-protest but they were clearly outnumbered by the women’s marchers, many of them are pro-choice. (Many of the anti-abortion protesters were in town for the annual March for Life, which usually happens on the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe vs. Wade decision that legalized abortion.)

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

The last time I was at a protest by the Lincoln Memorial was when I checked out the Juggalo March last September. There were far more people at this protest than at the Juggalo one. Yet this protest was less crowded than last year’s Women’s March but that wasn’t necessarily a bad thing. For one thing we weren’t packed tightly into a single area like sardines, which I definitely liked.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

One guy managed to swipe an anti-abortion sign and alter it in order to turn it into a pro-Planned Parenthood sign.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Naturally there were more vendors there as well.

Women's March on Washington 2018

This next photo, where I set the camera on the highest telephoto setting, was the closest I could get to the stage or the giant jumbotron video screen itself. But I was able to hear many of the speeches unlike last year, when I was too far away to hear anything.

Women's March on Washington 2018

I brought my portable folding chair with me so once I found a decent place to sit where I could hear the rally, I sat in my chair and ate my lunch. I only moved once when I needed to use one of the portapotties. Most of the speakers I heard were Democratic congresspeople (such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi) and DNC Chair Tom Perez.

I was really pissed when Debbie Wasserman Schultz took to the stage where she denounced Trump. I still remember when, during her time as DNC Chair in 2016, she helped in rigging the Democratic primaries that would allow Hillary Clinton to get the nomination. She disregarded the numerous polls that said that Bernie Sanders had a far better chance of defeating Donald Trump in the general election than Hillary Clinton. I’m not making this stuff up as a pro-Bernie sore loser. Former Interim-DNC Chair Donna Brazile wrote a book last year that basically confirmed this. As far as I’m concerned, Debbie Wasserman Schultz should not have been invited to go on stage giving her speech when she is one of the people who made Donald Trump’s election possible and I’ll never forgive her for this.

After sitting in my chair for a while I used the portapottie again. Afterwards I literally ran into a group of friends from my neighborhood, which thrilled me because I wouldn’t be protesting alone. The rally ran overtime like last year but it was bearable this time since we weren’t packed together like sardines. We walked around while I took a few pictures of a few people, such as this woman who played her violin while the protesters walked past her.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Even though the weather was mild on that day, the Reflecting Pool was frozen from all of those days of below-freezing temperatures that had been going on since Christmas. I saw people walking on the frozen Reflecting Pool despite a posted sign from the National Parks Service warning people not to do this. I didn’t see anyone fall through the ice but other people did because this news story had photos of people who crashed through the ice at the Women’s March. Fortunately the Reflecting Pool isn’t very deep but I still would never walk on the ice like that.

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

Women's March on Washington 2018

When the rally ended we started to march past the World War II Memorial.

Women's March 2018

Women's March 2018

Women's March 2018

We eventually reached Pennsylvania Avenue, NW where we marched down that street.

Women's March on Washington

Women's March on Washington

We walked past both the Secret Service and the DC Metropolitan Police.

Women's March on Washington

Women's March on Washington

We marched past the Renwick Gallery, which I recently visited on Christmas Eve.

Women's March on Washington

The march ended at the White House, where people gathered into both the closed-off area of Pennsylvania Avenue, NW and nearby Lafayette Square.

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

An impromptu dance party broke out in Lafayette Square while people took selfies and admired each other’s signs. Arriving at the White House gave all of us a chance to sit down. (At least I actually went on the march to the White House this year. Last year I was so tired and frazzled from being packed in the Mall that I didn’t even bother with marching.)

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The next two photos show an encampment that was originally set up by antiwar activists back in the early 1980s (when Ronald Reagan occupied the White House) and it still remains in Lafayette Square to this day despite the fact that the two original founders, William Thomas and Concepcion Picciotto, have since passed away.

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

As people left the White House area, many of them left their signs outside of the fence where I took a few more photos.

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

The Women's March on Washington 2018

I saw yet another vendor by the White House.

The Women's March on Washington 2018

After a while we all left the White House since the protest tended to peter out once we all reached the destination. We parted ways since my friends took a car into DC while I took the Metro. I walked towards the Metro Center station so I could take the Metro back to Maryland. On my way there I encountered this really nice looking historic clock that I couldn’t resist photographing.

Women's March on Washington 2018

At one point during the march we ran into a photographer we knew who shot a group picture of us. That photo of us was published in the latest issue of The Greenbelt News Review. The link (which opens in a new window) goes to a .pdf document but the photo in question is on the front page located in the bottom right hand corner. You can clearly see me in my Grumpy Cat hat on the right.

It’s the second year in the row that I participated in a Women’s March in January. I have a feeling that I’ll be attending more such annual marches wearing my Grumpy Cat hat until the Trump Administration leaves the White House or I die—whichever comes first.

For a comparison between this year’s march and last year’s march, check out my post about the 2017 Women’s March on Washington.

Late last week I uploaded a new story on TopBuzz.com. It’s about the Christmas house that’s on Delmar Avenue in Glen Burnie, Maryland. Yes, I’ve written about this house in this blog before but I wrote about it again in the hopes of getting a larger audience (and maybe earn some money). This year I noticed that the house had added something in one of the upper windows that produces an animation that simulates a factor churning out toys. I shot an updated video showing that new effect and it’s embedded in that article along with some new photos I took this year.

In case you’ve missed it, you can also read the first article I wrote for TopBuzz about the opening of the first medical cannabis dispensary in Silver Spring, Maryland and it included an appearance by former Baltimore Ravens football player Eugene Monroe.

Click here to learn more.

Several weeks ago I received an email from TopBuzz.com inviting me to write for them. Basically I would get paid depending on how many people read my articles. I decided to give them a shot for a while to see how well it works for me.

For my debut TopBuzz.com article, I wrote a story about yesterday’s opening of the first medical marijuana dispensary in Silver Spring, Maryland known simply as Rise. I took all of the photos in that post and I even shot a short video of a couple of speeches that were made at the opening ceremony (one of them by former Baltimore Ravens football player Eugene Monroe). You can read all about it right here.

Back during Labor Day weekend I spent the majority of my time at the Greenbelt Labor Day Festival. I participated in the Retro Town Fair where I won a few ribbons for my knitting. A couple of weeks ago The Greenbelt News Review did an article about the winners of the Retro Town Fair and I was mentioned in it. The story appeared in the October 19 issue (over a month after the event) and I was too bogged down by Inktober and going through two illnesses in the same month (I had a cold early in the month and I finished the month out by having that horrible stomach flu, which began on Halloween) to mention it in this blog. Now that Inktober is over and I’m over all of my latest illnesses, I can now write about it. Better late than never, I suppose.

That issue can be found online right here. The issue is in the .pdf format so you’ll have to do some scrolling. The article that mentions me is on page 17.

I uploaded my latest article that I wrote for LinkedIn Pulse a couple of days ago. It was an article I had been thinking about for a while. I finally got the incentive to write it late last week when the #JobMarket hashtag started to trend on LinkedIn. (That was in response to a new report that says that there are enough jobs for every person in the U.S. but employers complain about not finding the right person for the job.) It’s also a response to all those articles I’ve read over the years about the things that employees do—either on their resume or at the job interview—that leads to an employer not hiring that person. I decided that it was past time for someone to turn the tables and write about the things that employers do that leads a prospective employee to either not accept a job with that company or, if the person does gets hired, causes the new employee to soon leave that job. This article is based on my own struggles with looking for a day job to pay the bills along with a couple of jobs that I worked at, which ended up being short-lived. Here is my article:

The Things That Recruiters and Hiring Managers Do That are Major Turn-Offs For Prospective Employees

By the way, it’s not the first time I’ve written for LinkedIn Pulse. Click here to read the other articles I’ve written.

A few years ago, while I was in the throes of my recent separation from my husband and dealing with declining sales of my arts and crafts due to the recession, I became involved with a group that was trying to start a few new worker-owned cooperatives in the hopes of providing not only new jobs but green jobs as well.

I’ll admit that I had a selfish reason for getting involved—I was hoping to land whatever new jobs that would be created and I figured that I would land a better chance of getting a paying job if I helped the group out during the early days.

I came up with the idea of starting a thrift store and the group loved it so much that I was tasked with doing the research about starting one. I spoke with people who ran other thrift stores that already existed and found that it was very space-intensive. (You not only need a large space for items that are currently for sale but you also need additional storage space for out-of-season items so you don’t do things like try to sell heavy sweaters in August.) I also volunteered at the group’s booth for the 2014 Greenbelt Green Man Festival and I even made my first appearance in the 2014 Greenbelt Labor Day Parade on that group’s behalf as well.

Basically the thrift store idea fizzled because I found out that finding a large space for an affordable rent in the Washington, DC area is incredibly difficult, especially for a new thrift store. At one point the group suggested that I might try doing a series of weekend flea markets instead. That one was also a struggle because I needed to find suitable land which has adequate parking, suitable Metrobus access (for people who don’t have a car), and is easy to locate. What really killed the flea market idea was learning that I not only had to file a permit with the City of Greenbelt but I also had to file a permit with Prince George’s County as well. That’s right, two different types of paperwork at two levels of government. I finally just threw my hands up in the air and walked away.

Recently I got an email from the group saying that a reporter was doing a story about our efforts to start a bunch of worker-owned cooperatives. I had the reporter interview me by email. The story has just been published in In These Times magazine recently but a number of the interviews she did had to be cut because of space limitations in the print edition, including mine.

Even though my interview got cut, I’m going to provide the link to the web edition, which is online now.

The reporter sent another email recently where she mentioned the possibility of doing follow-up stories using the interview footage that was cut from the original story. If that happens, and if my interview actually gets used, I’ll definitely let you know.

I’ve recently published another article on OpenSource.com, which I not only wrote but I also took the photographs as well. Here’s the link:

How Linux and maker spaces can strengthen our social fabric

I have to thank Phil Shapiro for his suggestion that I write something for that website. I previously wrote a tutorial on tracing photos in Inkscape back in 2014 but I didn’t get much response to that one. Phil basically encouraged me to try again and he feels that this story might result in gaining a few new contacts that may help me find a new day job to help me pay the bills. Only time will tell whether Phil is right about this or not.

My article is about this event that was held one Saturday afternoon in May at the STEM center Makerspace 125 in Greenbelt, Maryland. It was a workshop titled “Build a PC and Install Linux.” Basically the attendees got hands-on experience in building a PC using donated used computer parts and installing the Ubuntu operating system. Once the attendees finished, they were allowed to take their new PC’s home free of charge. I took a bunch of photos that I uploaded on to Flickr and I showed Phil, who then urged me to write the OpenSource.com article.

But I’m going to show something from that workshop that’s exclusive only to readers of this blog. Like I wrote a few paragraphs ago, I took the pictures that are in that article. However, OpenSource.com only printed a few of the photos I took. So, as a treat to you readers, I’m going to post the outtakes from that article right here. All of them were taken during that workshop.

Here’s one of the Brood X cicadas that had hatched back in May who was crawling around in Roosevelt Center just a few feet away from Makerspace 125. Those bugs were not only big but they made this loud mating call that sounded like a car alarm and they were really noisy between sunrise and sunset.

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

The rest of the photos outtakes were taken inside Makerspace 125 during the workshop.

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

An automated knitting look at Makerspace 125.

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

Build A PC and Install Linux Workshop, Greenbelt, Maryland, May 20, 2017

If you want to see the photos that actually accompanied my article, click here.

Ramadan

I’ve heard plenty about how there’s a trend for people getting employment through the Gig Economy and how this has been hailed in news articles like this one. I also went to a workshop on this topic plus I heard it again when I served as an extra at a taping of an upcoming TV special featuring financial guru Ric Edelman.

I’m giving the Gig Economy a try but there is one thing I’ve encountered that doesn’t get mentioned in the mainstream media: Scammers are also lurking looking to take advantage of people who are looking for work. I wrote this story and posted on LinkedIn Pulse because I really think this scam trap needs to be publicized as widely as possible. Here’s the link to this article (which includes screenshots of a Google Hangout conversation with someone who sounds like a facsimile of one of those Nigerian prince email scammers).

Dangerous Potholes on the Road to the Gig Economy

I’ve been writing occasional articles for LinkedIn Pulse, the majority of which are crossposted from this blog. So far I’ve written seven articles in two years. I’ve been told that I need to start contributing there if I want to get my name out there in the professional world but it’s a challenge getting noticed. Even with a hot trendy topic like the Gig Economy I’ve gotten less than 50 hits as of this writing. I’m hoping that some of you reading this may want to check my latest article out, especially since that one is exclusively on LinkedIn Pulse and it hasn’t been crossposted in this blog.

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