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One day I was walking around the local Unitarian Universalist church when I decided to shoot a photo of a painting that had been hung in that church for years.

The man in the painting is of Reverend Rick Kelley, who’s the minister emeritus of Paint Branch Unitarian Universalist Church in Adelphi, Maryland (where this painting currently resides). He was the minister who officiated at my wedding (which later ended in divorce but that’s another story). He was the minister when my future husband and I first joined that congregation.

Rick Kelley retired from our church back in 1992 but he is still alive as of this writing. As a thank you for the 20 years of service he gave to this congregation, one of the rooms was named the Kelley Room in his honor and it included this painting of him that was done by one of the fellow church members.

The next photo shows the detail of the signature of the artist who painted his portrait along with the date he created this piece.

The artist who did this was named drex Andrex (who spelled his first name with a lowercase “d”). My then-husband and I first met him through our Unitarian Universalist congregation and we served on a variety of committees together and frequently met with him and his wife, Ann, at a variety of social events. drex would’ve loved to have been able to make a living as an artist but, unfortunately, he never made enough money at his art to pay the bills. He had a day job as a federal employee plus there were the years when he and his wife raised three children so he had to limit doing his art to whenever he had some free time.

drex was mainly into painting landscapes and cityscapes based on places where he and his family lived. (They lived in Europe for a few years—mainly Belgium and the United Kingdom—in the 1970’s and 1980’s.) He painted in an impressionist style and I’ve always loved his work. He tried selling his paintings to galleries and art dealers but he frequently got turned away. Having seen his work, I never understood why the galleries and art dealers rejected him. He was able to have a few art shows here and there but he really deserved better from the art world.

Sadly drex died pretty young of pancreatic cancer when he was only in his mid-50’s over 10 years ago. I still have this Christmas block print he did that I bring out every Christmas. (I even wrote a blog post about it a couple of years ago.)

Reverend Rick Kelley is still alive as of this writing and he currently lives in retirement in the southern U.S. with his wife, Mary Ann.

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I really was busy the first weekend in December. On Saturday I went to the Festival on the Green in Crofton, Maryland then I ended up at the Bowie Public Library because it was raining so hard and the other drivers were being so aggressive at the same time that I decided to ride out the worst of the storm there instead.

On Sunday I went to the Festival of Lights Holiday Market in Greenbelt, Maryland. While I was there I took part in an Artful Afternoon where I made this Norwegian-style heart-shaped woven paper ornament.

After those two events, I headed over to the nearby Greenbelt Makerspace where I attended the weekly animation meetup. After that event was over, I decided to head over to the other makerspace in Greenbelt that’s known simply as The Space. While I was there I took a few photos.

There was a 3Doodler pen that was available for anyone who wanted to do freehand 3D drawings in plastic.

The Space, December 2, 2018

Here is one of the customized vinyl toys on display at The Space.

The Space, December 2, 2018

There was an artist who was working on his latest painting at The Space.

The Space, December 2, 2018

By the time I left The Space it was already nighttime (the days have been growing shorter these days) so I headed home.

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My group for people who are separated or divorced was having a vendor sale where local vendors (some of whom are fellow group members) were selling their wares. They did this in conjunction with the Festival on the Green that was held at the Crofton Country Club located next door to the church where the vendor sale took place (and the same place where weekly meetings are held). Since money is extremely tight with me these days, I thought about skipping it until I received an email saying that they had gotten a recruiter to take part in this. He was collecting resumes because there were supposedly a bunch of places that were looking to hire people, especially in IT. When I learned about that recruiter, I decided to go there because I was curious to see if there is any kind of full-time work that’s available.

I had intended to spend no more than an hour in Crofton—just long enough to drop off my resume, speak with the recruiter, take a brief tour of the vendor sale and the Festival on the Green, then leave. It’s partly because the weather forecast called for rain and it’s partly because I had intended to go to another festival that’s closer to my home because I have a few friends who were vending there and I wanted to say hi to them. So I arrived at the vendor sale and I found out that everyone else had arrived except for the recruiter. The organizers of that vendor sale had said that they texted the recruiter and he texted back that he would be arriving soon but he didn’t know when. So I decided to kill some time by checking out the vendor sale, where I purchased just a couple of someone’s home-baked cookies and ate them. Then I walked over to the Festival on the Green next door and took a few pictures of what I saw there.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There was someone selling LuLaRoe clothes from a small blue bus. Just a few days after I took that photo I learned that someone had alleged in court that LuLaRoe is on the brink of collapse.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

I saw an 18-inch doll (I couldn’t tell if she was an American Girl or a competitor’s doll) with crocheted hats and scarves made for 18-inch dolls.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There were heaters and fire pits that were designed to keep people warm as they shopped around the various booths. (It was not only cloudy but it was around in the 40’s as well.)

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

The Grinch showed up along with the Chick-fil-A cow dressed up as Santa Claus.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There was a variety of arts and crafts available that one could buy. I could only look since money is pretty tight with me these days.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There was an art truck parked where people can see the paintings on sale.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There was another truck known as Tin Lizzy that sold fair trade clothing.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There was a hands-on demonstration of remote control race cars, which was a huge hit with the kids.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

There were a variety of food trucks, some of which had unique decorations.

Festival on the Green, December 1, 2018

I ended up eating a $4 bacon and cheese empanada that I purchased from one food truck along with a bag of Utz potato chips and a can of Diet Coke that I purchased from another truck. (I paid a total of $7, which is cheap by eating out standards.) By the time I purchased what I ate for lunch, it started to drizzle. I went back to my car and ate lunch there. After I finished I decided to go back to the church to see if the recruiter had arrived. It turned out that the recruiter still hadn’t arrived. I hung around and socialized with a few fellow members whom I haven’t seen in a while. (I haven’t been going to meetings lately due partly to tight finances and partly because the topics of those meetings tend to repeat and I’ve sat in on some topics at least three or times previously.)

I decided to wait until 1 p.m. for the recruiter, since the support group’s vendor sale as supposed to end at 2 p.m. (The Festival on the Green itself ran until 4 p.m.) So I waited and the guy ended up being a no-show and it started to rain harder outside. I gave up and decided to drive towards home. The rain grew so heavy that I decided to drive along the back roads because I just didn’t want to deal with the crazy assholes who speed in any weather on the interstate highways. When I hit Bowie I became more nervous because of the weather so I ended up stopping at the Bowie Library. It was the first time I had ever stepped inside and I took pictures, which I’ll write about in my next post.

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Like I wrote in a previous blog post, I attended two festivals in one day. The first one was the smaller Greenbelt Blues Festival, which I already wrote about. After attending that festival, I went to the Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, which was a larger event. Here are the photos I took of the event while I was there.

This sign erroneously said that this festival was held on September 10. In reality, it showed up on September 22.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

The festival was well-attended and there were all kinds of arts and crafts on display along with local bands performing. The local craft breweries were selling their craft beers and ales. The weather was warm and pleasant (the humidity was low that day). All in all I had a good time and many of the festival goers also enjoyed themselves as well.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, Hyattsville, Maryland, September 22, 2018.

I only purchased one item at this festival. It’s a small bar of soap made from honey and it has a bee motif on it.

Hyattsville Arts & Ales Festival, September 22, 2018

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This U Street bar in Washington, DC shuts down every August so its owner can build schools around the world.

Government costs rise when the local newspaper dies.

Meet the real-life woman behind many of Gustav Klimt’s paintings.

What happens when a bad-tempered, distractible doofus runs an empire?

Take a virtual tour of ancient Rome circa 320 C.E.

In 1912 this Georgia county drove out every black resident.

IKEA asked people to bully a plant for 30 days to see what happens. The results are eye-opening.

The “Real” America: 21.5% unemployment, 10% inflation, and negative economic growth.

How Donald Trump’s grandfather originally made his fortune.

This British gent lives life like it’s the 1940s.

A new study finds that IQ scores are falling and they have been for decades.

This political theorist predicted the rise of Trumpism. His name was Hunter S. Thompson.

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Josh Hader is the latest example of how online posts from the past can affect us today.

What’s the common thread among sexual harassers? Too often, it’s money.

Woman from viral frozen eyelash selfie shares equally intense summer-themed picture.

A preview of a U.S. society without pensions.

The retail apocalypse has been postponed.

This Lego R/C creation as a flying toy is just plain cool.

Without Net Neutrality, is it time to build your own Internet?

Anti-Trump artists turn room in President’s Manhattan hotel into rat-filled exhibit.

A compendium of Native American tipi decoration circa 1900.

The rise and fall of the “Freest Little City in Texas.”

Everyone’s laughing at pro-Trump artist Jon McNaughton’s latest painting.

Daughter shows what Alzheimer’s did to her mother’s ability to crochet and the last piece will break your heart.

Twitter sided with Nazis over a Jewish journalist.

This guy asked for the gayest cake ever and the bakery delivered.

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This Twitter bot tricks angry trolls into arguing with it for hours.

High anxiety: The surreal and disturbingly dreamlike paintings of George Tooker.

How to turn a broken terra-cotta pot shard into a lovely flower pendant.

Colin Kaepernick’s exile is a labor rights violation. Unions should come to his defense.

Mother of two wakes up at 4 am to create 18th century furniture for dollhouses and the details will amaze you.

The shockingly simple, surprisingly cost-effective way to end homelessness.

A jeweler called her $130 engagement ring “pathetic.” The woman’s response goes viral.

The women reporters who sparked the #MeToo movement are already being written out of the story.

Your Christmas decorations can’t compete with the light-up Millennium Falcon on this family’s roof.

Studies show that husbands stress women twice as much as children.

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A few weeks earlier I wrote a blog post about some interesting art on the walls of my Unitarian Universalist congregation that was done by a local self-taught artist named Antonio Moore. More recently the church held an artist reception for Moore immediately following the weekly Sunday service.

As part of the artist reception Moore gave a live demonstration of his painting style. Here are a couple of photos.

I also shot this short video os his painting demonstration.

Here’s the finished product.

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I was originally raised a Roman Catholic. My family attended a Roman Catholic church that had the usual Christian art featuring Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and a few saints. I grew up thinking that churches only displayed religious art and nothing else.

When I started attending a Unitarian Universalist church as a young adult who was a recent college graduate, I was amazed to see art that not only didn’t reflect a particular religious point of view but the artworks themselves would frequently rotate on a regular basis where new art would be erected and displayed. Much of the art that’s usually on display were created by local artists, many of whom are not UUs.

When I visited other UU churches in other cities, I found that many congregations also featured a rotating display of art done by area artists (who may or may not be UU) that didn’t necessarily reflect a particular religious dogma.

Many of the art my church (Paint Branch Unitarian Universalist Church in Adelphi, Maryland) displays run the gamut from painting to drawing to mixed-media to sculptures to photography. Some of the art is abstract while others might feature a portrait of a person or an animal or it might reflect a certain view on social issues or politics.

Here are a few photos I took of an art exhibit that’s currently on display at my church right now. They are a series of paintings done by a local self-taught artist named Antonio Moore, who has sold some of his work to famous people such as Mark Cuban and Jay-Z. His paintings include people like Kiss, Miles Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Bob Marley, Frank Sinatra, and Barack Obama.

If you want to see the art for yourself in person, the best time is on Sunday mornings after 11:15 a.m. (when Sunday service usually ends) until around 1 or 2 p.m. For other times, you will have to contact the church office to make special arrangements.

UPDATE (August 9, 2018): Later I went to the artist reception for Antonio Moore where I shot photos and a video of Moore giving a live painting demonstration.

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