The late 1990’s-early 2000’s Internet was relatively crude compared to today. For one thing, there was no YouTube or Vimeo or Daily Motion or any other video sharing site. If you wanted to show videos online, you had to create your own website and learn how to embed HTML codes on your webpage that will make your video appear online for others to view.

If that weren’t enough, one also had to be aware of file sizes for each video he/she wanted to post online. Many ISP’s charged according to server space size as well as bandwidth (meaning how long it took to stream a video file online).

And then there were how people used to access the Internet online. While many universities and larger businesses had very fast broadband access to the Internet, this was a very expensive option that wasn’t available in all areas. As a result, most homes could only go online with a modem that was connected to phone lines. This meant that, for most Internet users, anything as sophisticated as video would take a very long time to download if a person’s sole access to the Internet was a 28.8 modem connected to a phone line.

As a result many video creators had to severely limit their videos by length (the shorter the video, the better), resolution (HD videos were definitely out of the question at this time because of insanely slow download times), and screen size (320 x 240 pixels was the most common screen size).

It was nearly impossible to watch a full-length feature film online using a modem connected to a phone line (unless you were willing to tie up your phone line for anywhere from 12-24 hours). But one enterprising site came up with this novel idea: doing parody movie trailers for non-existent films that lasted no more than a minute or two.

The result was Trailervision. I first read about this site in a magazine and I checked it out. Trailervision was the first video site I ever visited on a regular basis mainly because I could download the latest Trailervision videos in 20-30 minutes.

Trailervision was frequently hilarious as it skewered the various film and TV genres such as drama, science fiction, horror, and reality TV. That site was a perfect example of trying to do something unique, creative, and original with the limitations of the technology at that time.

Trailervision was fun while the videos were shown for free. I stopped visiting when Trailervision decided to switch to a paid subscription model where subscribers would be the first to get the latest videos while everyone else had to wait a while until Trailervision decided to release an older video for free viewing.

Trailervision is now defunct with only this Wikipedia page documenting the site’s onetime existence.  Fortunately one Trailervision fan has managed to gather many of the original videos and has created a YouTube playlist of Trailervision videos. Some of the humor is dated (especially the gags about AOL, modems, and the Y2K bug) but most of these trailers are still pretty funny and enjoyable after all these years. Here is that playlist for you to relive the glory days of Trailervision.

And if that playlist isn’t enough, a different fan has uploaded his/her own copies of the original Trailervision files on the YouTube channel TrailervisionLine.

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