Last summer I took a driving trip along the Star-Spangled Banner Trail where I made a stop at the Patuxent Rural Life Museums, which feature a collection of late 19th century-early 20th century buildings. Among those buildings is a house that’s known as a Sears House because anyone could order these buildings directly from Sears. All the customer needed was land to build the house on. A typical Sears House arrived in separate pieces and it usually came with a manual that instructed the purchaser on how to construct the house together. If a customer wasn’t into the DIY approach, he/she could hire construction workers to do the job.

The Sears House that is part of the Patuxent Rural Life Museums is a 1923 Sears House that was the cheapest house that Sears offered at the time. It is a basic no-frills model that has one bedroom and no plumbing. For an extra $40 one could buy a separate kit to build an outhouse. That particular Sears House has very narrow rooms and it’s definitely not meant for a large family. Here are a few photos I took of that Sears House last year.

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To see pictures of the other buildings of the Patuxent Rural Life Museums, check out the blog post I wrote on September 14, 2015.

The Washington, DC area has numerous Sears Houses that still have families living in them. Many of these Sears Houses can be found in Takoma Park, Maryland. One of my friends lives in a house that he says is a Sears House. Here is the front of that house.

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Here’s the backyard. It looks so rustic and peaceful that it’s hard to believe that this house is located less than a mile from the Washington, DC city border.

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This particular Sears House happens to have a cat named Rocket living there.

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