I’m in the process of turning over a portion of my front lawn that slopes up a hill into a strawberry patch. I’m doing this for the following reasons: 1) I’m so tired of pushing the lawn mower up that hill (which is a bit on the steep side), 2) I want a plant that grows low to the ground compared to grass and weeds so I won’t have to worry about mowing it, and 3) I love strawberries and it would be cool to have a strawberry crop. I could not only make all kinds of wonderful dishes with it (like strawberry shortcake) but I could use it as a barter tool where I could get a friend or neighbor help me with some short task in the future in exchange for a bag of strawberries. What’s more, I can even freeze strawberries for use in the winter. The only major hassle would be dealing with the birds, squirrels, and other animals who’d want to steal it but, otherwise, it’s a win all around for me.

A few weeks ago I got my first strawberry, which I documented for posterity.

myfirststrawberry

I’ve picked and eaten more strawberries since then. The strawberries are small but they pack way more intense flavor than the big strawberries that are frequently sold in the supermarkets. Which leads to my frequent complaint: Bigger is NOT always better. There are times when smaller is preferable. When it comes to strawberries, smaller is better because the flavor is more intense. I’ve eaten too many large strawberries at various parties and they always tend to taste bland. I’ve even eaten really big strawberries that literally had next to no flavor.

The supermarkets, restaurants, and catering places can keep their huge strawberries. I’ll just stick with my own tiny berries with the intense flavor.

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