The city of Annapolis is known for a lot of things. It’s the state capital of Maryland.

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It’s a city that’s rich in history dating back to the 1600’s, such as St. Anne’s Parish, an Episcopalian church that was founded in 1692.

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There are plenty of memorials and plaques showing Annapolis’ place in U.S. history.

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There are statues honoring the famous, such as this one that was devoted to Roots author Alex Haley and Haley’s ancestor, Kunta Kinte, who was forcibly taken from Africa to America via Annapolis in order to work as a slave.

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Annapolis also has a rich maritime culture where it’s not unusual to see sailboats sailing in Annapolis harbor or seeing boats docked at the Annapolis City Dock.

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The local wildlife are relatively tame enough to actually walk close to you (mainly because they are on the prowl for any edible handouts).

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Plus there’s the shopping and the benches where, on a warm day, one could see people gather.

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There is the occasional wall mural and classic Greco-Roman style statue that provide pleasant viewing while walking around on the streets of Annapolis.

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There are also a few progressive touches as well. The parking garage where I parked my car has spots where electric car owners can recharge their cars.

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There’s a parking meter outside the Christian Science Reading Room where people can drop their change in a meter—not to park their cars but to help the homeless.

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But there’s one thing about Annapolis that rarely gets mentioned, although it would soon become apparent once you walk or drive along West Street: chicken statues. That’s right, Annapolis has a bunch of chicken statues. The chickens started as a public art project similar to the cows of Boston, the fish of Baltimore, and the panda bears of Washington, DC. They have been an Annapolis fixture ever since.

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Most of the chickens roost on West Street. Here’s a map showing where the statues are located in case you’re planning to visit Annapolis sometime in the near future and you want to see those chickens for yourself.

UPDATE (January 10, 2016): Since I wrote my entry I visited Annapolis during New Year’s holiday weekend where I saw a statue that I hadn’t seen before. I suspect that it’s a statue that’s only displayed during the winter months. This one answers this question: What do you get if you crossed a chicken with a snowman?

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