Red Prince Doll Outfit
Red Prince Doll Outfit
Red Prince Doll Outfit
Red Prince Doll Outfit
Red Prince Doll Outfit

My Fantasy Doll Tobias is modeling an outfit that I made that I call “The Red Prince Outfit” because he looks very princely in it. I made it using a pattern called “The Poet” that was created by Gracefaerie Designs. (I purchased it from Denver Doll Emporium.) The white shirt, belt, ribbon, and pants were made out of fabric found on the remnant table at a local Jo-Ann’s Fabrics & Crafts store. The red fabric had some interesting sparking pattern that is noticeable when viewed closely. I punched some rivets into the belt so it could be strung with red ribbon. The white shirt was trimmed with lace that was leftover from previous projects.

This outfit is notable in two ways. One was that this was an outfit that I quickly whipped up and managed to complete the day before my scheduled hip replacement operation in 2008. I only did this project as a way of getting my mind off the upcoming surgery and I figured that my Fantasy Doll Tobias could use a new outfit since his wardrobe was small compared to my other dolls.

The other was that I was experimenting with something called Paverpol, which is this glue-like substance. I learned about Paverpol when I was visiting the 2008 Doll & Teddy Bear Expo in Washington, DC and I came upon a table that was selling Paverpol. The big hype was that Paverpol could be used to recycle used t-shirts into funky statues (which is a cool idea–especially if you’re into recycling and going green). This salesman approached me the minute I approached the table and was talking about how great Paverpol is and how you can use it to make “no-sew doll clothes” and he was trying to pressure me into buying some Paverpol. (He was a bit on the pushy side.) The table only had large containers of Paverpol available for around $25 and I was reluctant to fork over that much money on a substance that I was not familiar with and wasn’t sure if I was going to like it. I didn’t want to risk buying one of the large Paverpol containers only to realize that I didn’t like using it and I would be stuck with trying to get rid of a large container. I told him that I was broke (which was partially true since I had just purchased a Goodreau Dolls Wiggles the Pig earlier at the same show but I did have $25 extra dollars that I could’ve forked over if I wanted). So he gave me a free sample of the stuff and urged me to visit the Paverpol USA site to buy more.

A few months after that show, I finally pulled out my sample to experiment with making no-sew doll clothes. The good thing is that it’s faster than handsewing. The downside is that the hems tend to be stiffer than if they had been hand- or machine-sewed. The final verdict is that Paverpol is great if you urgently need some doll clothes (especially if you recent purchased a naked doll–many Asian ball-jointed dolls tend to be shipped nude–and you want to put come clothes on that doll) and don’t have much time for sewing. But if you’re particular about clothes or you plan on making high quality doll clothes to sell on eBay or Etsy, then you may not want to go the Paverpol route.

Despite the stiff hems that I got with Paverpol, I was pretty much happy with my own Red Prince outfit.

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